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Hi there
I was reading a book. not matter what about it.
I saw a sentence, cant explain it used which means. Can you help me?

"I was told to change trains at Dumfiers."
we can see this is not passive voice or something like that.
Is there any mistake in this?
Thanks.
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pcgamebeer passive voice
Yes, it's passive.

Somebody told me [ to do something] is active.
I was told (by somebody) [to do something] is passive.

In the examples above, "somebody" is called the agent. In your example, the agent is omitted. It doesn't say who you were told by. But it's still passive even if you leave out the by-phrase.

In short, your sentence (I was told to change trains at Dumfiers.) is correct.

CJ
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That's correct. 'I was told' is passive.

eg "I was told (by my friend) to change trains at Dumfiers."

"I was told to change trains at Dumfiers."

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Comments  

but which tense is the sentence (I was told to do....)

Mojeeb

But which tense is the sentence (I was told to do...)?

past (was)

CJ

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Is it past perfect or past prograsive, or past perfect prograsive tense, I m confused which exact tense and aspect are these, because to be (was/we're) + participle verb is not in any furmole.
Is it past perfect or past prograsive, I wanna know the exact tense and aspect of such these sentences, because to be (was/were) is not in any structure of any tense.
MojeebI wanna want to know the exact tense and aspect ...

We don't always get what we want. Emotion: sad

Say I would like to know the exact tense and aspect or Please tell me the exact tense and aspect ...

I told - Simple Past (Active voice)

I was told -
Simple Past (Passive voice)


I looks to me like you have some kind of verb chart that shows you only the active verb forms. Try to find a more complete verb chart that also shows you the passive verb forms.

CJ

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But may I ask is it (perfect) or (prograssive) aspect?

Because I readed these two types of aspects only.

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
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