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Wacth out for safety as you back up.

Is this correct?

Thanks
LiJ
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LiveinjapanWacth Watch out for safety as you back up. Except the typo, the sentence is okay.

Is this correct?

Thanks
LiJ
Thanks, Hoa Thai. Emotion: smile Got it.
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The sentence is a little odd in AmE.

Most common would be: "Be careful as you back up." or "Watch out for hazards as you back up."

If you need to use "safety", then I would say "For your safety, you need to watch out for hazards as you back up."
VorparThe sentence is a little odd in AmE.

Most common would be: "Be careful as you back up." or "Watch out for hazards as you back up."

If you need to use "safety", then I would say "For your safety, you need to watch out for hazards as you back up."
Hi Vopar,

I agree with what you said when you caution people who perform the act not to get hurt themselves. However, I have seen people use 'Watch out for safety' when they think about the safety of potentially unintended victims. Safety here is the safety of others. Here is an example:

"On the downside they're not very padded or comfortable particularly for younger babies, and the lack of a tray may be inhibiting if you want your child to get on with colouring/baking/playdough - without trashing the table. Watch out for safety too - you may need to invest in an extra harness and be scrupulous about fitting it" - Highchair Mumsnet Guide.

Regards,
Hoa Thai
You're right, but that's an example of BrE.

Since I speak AmE, I'm only in a position to offer my opinion about my own dialect.
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Hi guys,

Watch out for safety as you back up.

I would say the commonest expression would be simply 'Watch out as you back up'.

'Watch out' means 'be careful', so safety is strongly implied by the phrase itself. In other words, 'for safety' seems rather redundant.

Usually, the 'for' phrase specifies the hazard, eg 'Watch out for children as you back up'.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveHi guys,

Watch out for safety as you back up.

I would say the commonest expression would be simply 'Watch out as you back up'.

'Watch out' means 'be careful', so safety is strongly implied by the phrase itself. In other words, 'for safety' seems rather redundant.

Usually, the 'for' phrase specifies the hazard, eg 'Watch out for children as you back up'.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi Clive,

I understand what you tried to convey. However, I have never heard that children are the hazard in this context. 'Children' here means the safety of the children.

Best,
Hoa Thai
Hi,

I understand what you tried to convey. However, I have never heard that children are the hazard in this context. 'Children' here means the safety of the children.


Yes, but such an example is commonly said. To a driver, it seems reasonable in my opinion to consider children as a hazard. The idea is that, if you hit one of them, you are in big trouble. It's like saying 'Watch out for that parked car', meaning 'Don't hit it'.

Clive
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