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1) She watched him climb the mountian.

2) He watched the tears rolling down from her eyes.

3) He watched to make sure he finished the job.

I know that "watch" (or hear, etc) should be followed by bare infinitive. It can also be followed by -ing form with a little difference in meaning. I've checked a few dictionary and none of them mention that "watch" can be followed by "to". But I just intuitively know that sentence 3) is correct. Does anyone know why?? Thanks a million.

btw, should it be "none of them mentions" or "none of them mention"?
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For sentence 3, I understand it in this way, "He watched--------->(for the purpose of) to make sure he finished the job".

It is not "watched to" but it is "He watched" +"to make sure he finished the job".

Let's wait others' views.

I prefer "none of them mentions" as "none" is treated as singular.
Dear Joey_five,

You may think of it as «He watched in order to make sure he finished the job».

I have noticed that British people use plural verbs with «none». I do not know what American people use.

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
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thank you all.

But what part of speech is "in order to" ? connective? or adverb? or???
any other somments on the "watch to" usage?? Thanks
Joey_fiveany other somments on the "watch to" usage??
Hello

"The teacher watched (=be on alert) to see what his students would do"

paco
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Paco2004
Joey_fiveany other somments on the "watch to" usage??
Hello

"The teacher watched (=be on alert) to see what his students would do"

paco
so you mean in this usage, "watch to" doesn't really mean watch, it means "observe" or "monitor" ...?


1) She watched him climb the mountian.

2) He watched the tears rolling down from her eyes.

3) He watched to make sure he finished the job.
... I've checked a few dictionar[ies] and none of them mention that "watch" can be followed by "to".

The use of the bare infinitive or the gerund (Examples 1 & 2) are special properties of the verb "watch". Only a few verbs have these special properties. That's why dictionaries may make special mention of these facts.

On the other hand, the use of an infinitive of purpose (Example 3) has nothing to do with the verb "watch". It can be used with almost any verb. That's why dictionaries don't mention it in the entries on specific verbs.

The infinitive of purpose answers the question "Why?".

Joe left the room to check on the children.
Joe left the room. Why did he leave the room? (Because he wanted) to check on the children.

Joe left to check on the children.
Joe left. Why did he leave? (Because he wanted) to check on the children.

In the second grouping above, we omit "the room". That brings "left" in contact with "to". But that doesn't mean that there is anything special about the expression "left to".

Likewise with Example 3:

Joe watched. Why did he watch? (Because he wanted) to make sure Paul finished the job.
Joe watched. Why? To make sure Paul finished the job.
Joe watched to make sure Paul finished the job.

"watched" and "to" come into contact here. But again, that doesn't mean that there is anything special about the expression "watch to".

CJ
It's necessary that a distinction be made between sentence structures.

[watch object V/Ving] and [watch to V] are different in essence. When you use an object and the object is the agent of the action expressed by V/Ving, you cannot choose a to-infinitive. This applies to your example sentences 1 and 2. [to V] in your third example simply expresses purpose, as others have already said. You may adopt quite a few expressions to signify purposes: in order to V, so as to V, to V, for Ving, so that S V, etc.

It is noteworthy, however, that even in the [watch object V/Ving] pattern, if you want to express purpose, you should use [to V]. See the sentence below.

I watched the movie to find out who starred in it. (to find out: purpose)

cf. I watched him drawing a picture. ('him' is the agent of 'drawing'.)

Hope this helps.
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