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He is different from the rest in the way he works hard.

I think 'in the way' can be interpreted as 'in how': the manner of doing the job is different. But is it also possible to take it as 'in that' , implying what aspect is different?
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He is different from the rest in the way he works hard.

Perhaps this is a bit oversimplified, possibly leading to some ambiguity in what we're saying here.
Let's say that the first sense is: He is different from the rest in the fact that he works hard. The others may not work hard at all. (what he does)

The second sense is: He is different from the rest in the manner in which he works hard. The others also work hard, but he does it differently. (how he does it)
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Yes, you're right on both counts.
In the second sense, we might go on to illucidate that "aspect."
When speaking it aloud, the "way" might be emphasized to make clear that the second sense is intended.
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 Avangi's reply was promoted to an answer.
Good. And in reading, the decisive factor to tell which meaning is intended is its context?
TakaGood. And in reading, the decisive factor to tell which meaning is intended is its context?
Yes. Context would determine which sense is intended, if the sentence were read silently rather than spoken.
If there were no context available, I suppose it could be taken either way, but I feel most people would take it in the first sense.

Ironically, the second sense may be "truer" to the meaning of "way," in a higher register usage; but I think the first sense is more common in casual conversation.
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AvangiIf there were no context available, I suppose it could be taken either way, but I feel most people would take it in the first sense.Ironically, the second sense may be "truer" to the meaning of "way," in a higher register usage; but I think the first sense is more common in casual conversation.
I was kind of amazed that most people's default understanding was the first sense 'the fact', not 'the manner'. Very interesting.

By the way your first 'second sence' here:
AvangiYes, you're right on both counts.In the second sense, we might go on to illucidate that "aspect."When speaking it aloud, the "way" might be emphasized to make clear that the second sense is intended.
of course refers to my second one, the one implying 'aspect', and is different from the one you mentioned in the following posts, right?
Perhaps not everyone will agree with me on which sense would be the default one, sans context.

I tried to maintain my references to first and second senses according to the way you first set them out. If one of my references was unclear, let me know which one, and I'll try to clarify.

Rgdz, - A.
AvangiI tried to maintain my references to first and second senses according to the way you first set them out.
Really? I said:
TakaII think 'in the way' can be interpreted as 'in how': the manner of doing the job is different. But is it also possible to take it as 'in that' , implying what aspect is different?
and you replied:
AvangiYes, you're right on both counts.In the second sense, we might go on to illucidate that "aspect."When speaking it aloud, the "way" might be emphasized to make clear that the second sense is intended.
so up to this point, 'how' was the first, and 'aspect' the second. But then you said:
AvangiLet's say that the first sense is: He is different from the rest in the fact that he works hard. The others may not work hard at all. (what he does)The second sense is: He is different from the rest in the manner in which he works hard. The others also work hard, but he does it differently. (how he does it)
AvangiI suppose it could be taken either way, but I feel most people would take it in the first sense. Ironically, the second sense may be "truer" to the meaning of "way," in a higher register usage; but I think the first sense is more common in casual conversation.
So from here you seemed to switch the order, didn't you?
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Sorry, Taka. I'll try to sort it out in a while. My brain is a bit muddled.

The post which was ultimately turned olive and relocated was written in response to the fear that what I had said before might be ambiguous. Maybe the meanings got flipped. I'll check it. Emotion: embarrassed
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