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And I suspect that it is derived from the pious pseudo-scriptural jargon of some evangelical Protestant Christians who use terms ... gossip, back-biting, quarrels, slander, and, of course, the big three, the most serious ones of all: drinking, smoking and swearing.

You left out masturbation!
Talking the talk but not walking the walk is the prelude to taking a step back onto the slippery slope ... on personal impressions and observations. No doubt proper scientific historical language studies would show that another explanation is more tenable.

I'm not sure about origins, but that is the contextin which I first encountered it, too.

Redwine
Hamburg
(previously: Berlin, Northants, Derbs, Staffs, NSW, Tasmania, Melbourne, rural Victoria, in that and many other orders)
The earliest Proquest cite I can find for the standard ... "I've walked the walk so I can talk the talk."

It's interesting that the context is drugs and alcohol. Looking on IMDB, I see that there's a 1970 film entitled Walk the Walk , whose plot is summarized as A young black theological student battles against his heroin addiction and alcoholism.

Hmm, interesting. The second earliest cite on ProQuest quotes Dr. Judianne Densen-Gerber, executive director of Odyssey Houses, a group of drug care centers in New York:
A Crusader Aiding Addicts;
Doctor Leads Crusade For Teen-aged Addicts
New York Times, Mar 6, 1970, p. 41
I've asked (Mayor) Lindsay to walk among my children and I'm still waiting for him. 'It's not enough to talk the talk; you have to walk the walk.'"
There's also a book called Walk the Walk and Talk the Talk: An Ethnography of a Drug Abuse Treatment Facility by Geoffrey R. Skoll (Temple Univ. Press, 1992). It seems like this has long been a known catchphrase amongst those treating alcohol and drug addiction.
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"Have you every heard the joke that goes: What's the ... ecology page does, and was convinced his way was right..

Your opening had me puzzled. I agree with you here.

Hmm... I'm still puzzled here. I just can't seem to make sense of it, regardless of whether I have the pig or the chicken being 'committed'. Could someone perhaps explain this in a little more detail? Also, when we say 'the chicken is involved', do we have in mind the egg, or the chicken that laid the egg?
Christian culture tends to be pretty self serving and selfcentered. Walk the walk, talk the talk,
All pretty little cliche for stupid hillbilly PWT. Enjoy your 15 minutes christianXer's, with a little luck your entire click will be a footnote in history soon. You aren't hated for the Lords sake, your hated because your trash.
Hmm... I'm still puzzled here. I just can't seem to make sense of it, regardless of whether I have the ... we say 'the chicken is involved', do we have in mind the egg, or the chicken that laid the egg?

Maybe you're trying too hard. The chicken is involved, because she lays the egg. But she walks away when it's over. The pig doesn't. That's the difference between "involved" and "committed" (according to the joke).

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
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I consider this the standard form of the expression. But ... them? Are you really a or just a poseur?"...

I don't see a great deal of difference, except that your paraphrase is a bit more direct and provocative.

My paraphrase didn't say anything about leadership.
Mark Brader > "Simple things should be simple." Alan Kay, on UIs (Email Removed) > "Too many ... try to make complex things simple ... Toronto > and succeed ... only in making simple things complex."
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Your opening had me puzzled. I agree with you here.

Hmm... I'm still puzzled here. I just can't seem to make sense of it, regardless of whether I have the ... we say 'the chicken is involved', do we have in mind the egg, or the chicken that laid the egg?

I've always heard it "the chicken is involved, but the pig is committed".
It's the chicken that laid the egg. If you're puzzled, think about what the chicken has given up, and what the pig has given up, to make their respective contributions to your breakfast. If you're still puzzled, look to the story of the three-legged pig for enlightenment.

Chris Green
Christian culture tends to be pretty self serving and selfcentered. Walk the walk, talk the talk, All pretty little cliche ... soon. You aren't hated for the Lords sake, your hated because your trash. Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.

Depends what you mean by 'virus', I suppose.
Mike.
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Hmm... I'm still puzzled here. I just can't seem to ... mind the egg, or the chicken that laid the egg?

Maybe you're trying too hard. The chicken is involved, because she lays the egg. But she walks away when it's over. The pig doesn't. That's the difference between "involved" and "committed" (according to the joke).

Sebastian's a man: he doesn't commit himself to getting involved.

Mike.
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