Final paragraph of an article at
http://mobilemediaph.com/projectE/PrintSupplement/ethel 2latesierra.html

"Have you every heard the joke that goes: What's the difference between commitment and involvement? Well, it's the difference between eggs and bacon the chicken is committed but the pig is involved. When it comes to biodiversity conservation and the ecosystem, try as we might to pretend to be good chickens in truth, we are all bacon here."
I get exactly two Google hits for "pig is involved" +"chicken is committed"...517 for the converse, which is the only way that really makes sense...I wouldn't even have thought to try it the other way, except that I was recently reminded of a former boss of mine who said it exactly the way this ecology page does, and was convinced his way was right..

This follows an attempt to find the actual meanings of a common pair of phrases:

"walk the walk" 83,400 hits
"talk the talk" 64,000
"walk the talk" 43,300
"talk the walk" 1,670
Same boss who confused the pig and the chicken felt that "walk the walk" referred to greater "buy-in" and he couldn't be swayed...I do find one site that explains the homogenized forms as follows:
"'Walking the talk' is living up to your words, but you also need to 'Talk the walk' and be clear about the walk you want to take."

Is this more obvious to other people than it is to me?...because I can't see how they derive that meaning from the given words..r
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Final paragraph of an article at http://mobilemediaph.com/projectE/PrintSupplement/ethel 2latesierra.html "Have you every heard the joke that goes: What's the difference between ... boss of mine who said it exactly the way this ecology page does, and was convinced his way was right..

Your opening had me puzzled. I agree with you here.
This follows an attempt to find the actual meanings of a common pair of phrases: "walk the walk" 83,400 hits "talk the talk" 64,000 "walk the talk" 43,300 "talk the walk" 1,670 Same boss who confused the pig and the chicken felt that "walk the walk" referred to greater "buy-in" and he couldn't be swayed...I do find one site that explains the homogenized forms as follows: "'Walking the talk' is living up to your words, but you also need to 'Talk the walk' and be clear about the walk you want to take." Is this more obvious to other people than it is to me?...because I can't see how they derive that meaning from the given words..r

I have never, knowingly, encountered anything but "walk the walk" and "talk the talk". I would equate "walk the talk" with "practise what you preach".

Redwine
Hamburg
(previously: Berlin, Northants, Derbs, Staffs, NSW, Tasmania, Melbourne, rural Victoria, in that and many other orders)
This follows an attempt to find the actual meanings of a common pair of phrases: "walk the walk" 83,400 hits "talk the talk" 64,000 "walk the talk" 43,300 "talk the walk" 1,670 Same boss who confused the pig and the chicken felt that "walk the walk" referred to greater "buy-in" and he couldn't be swayed...I do find one site that explains the homogenized forms as follows: "'Walking the talk' is living up to your words, but you also need to 'Talk the walk' and be clear about the walk you want to take." Is this more obvious to other people than it is to me?...because I can't see how they derive that meaning from the given words..r

I have never, knowingly, encountered anything but "walk the walk" and "talk the talk".

Same here. My understanding is that it comes from the American Civil Rights movement of the 1950s. Someone who said the right things about integration and civil rights, but wasn't willing to put his own safety on the line by marching in the South "talked the talk" but didn't "walk the walk".
It then got metaphorically extended to people who didn't do other things to further their own stated civil rights principles (e.g., hiring blacks or serving them) and finally to other situations in which people's behavior didn't live up to their espoused beliefs, especially if risk was involved.
When this came up in 2000, Dennis Bathory-Kitsz said that he thought that there was a discussion of the phrase in Smitherman's Talkin and Tastifyin , but it doesn't appear in the index and a glance through the book doesn't turn it up.
I would equate "walk the talk" with "practise what you preach".

I'm not sure how (or if) I'd understand it.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >The whole idea of our government is
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >this: if enough people get togetherPalo Alto, CA 94304 >and act in concert, they can take

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Same boss who confused the pig and the chicken felt that "walk the walk" referred to greater "buy-in" and he ... to other people than it is to me?...because I can't see how they derive that meaning from the given words..r

A version I've seen on wall-posters here is:
"You can talk the talk, but can you walk the walk?"

It is supposed to mean that leading by example is
better than just talking. I think this sort of language is some copywriter's idea of how football coaches
talk to their boys at halftime.

Michael West
Melbourne, Australia
Same boss who confused the pig and the chicken felt ... see how they derive that meaning from the given words..r

A version I've seen on wall-posters here is: "You can talk the talk, but can you walk the walk?" It ... I think this sort of language is some copywriter's idea of how football coaches talk to their boys at halftime.

From another viewpoint:
"You can talk the talk, but can you walk the walk" seems a bit flawed (which could easily happen with either copywriters or football coaches) for delivering the message it is meant to deliver.

Consider: If one can "talk the talk," then one can speak the lingo, explain things, understand things. It is not necessarily bad to "talk the talk."
And: "Walk the walk" is not necessarily a good thing. It can mean copying the motions of others and still not getting the job done.

Thus a saying can sound clever (and still be a villain).

Just a suggestion. I'm not sure it's serious.
Maria Conlon
"...and your flag decal won't get you
into Heaven any more" (C&W song)
I have never, knowingly, encountered anything but "walk the walk" and "talk the talk".

Same here. My understanding is that it comes from the American Civil Rights movement of the 1950s. Someone who said ... and Tastifyin , but it doesn't appear in the index and a glance through the book doesn't turn it up.

The earliest Proquest cite I can find for the standard version is from 1969:
Congressional 'Doings'
Washington Post, Jul 25, 1969, p. C1
One is Sen. Harold Hughes' subcommittee on Alcoholism and Narcotics. Hughes himself is a big, thoroughly attractive ex-drunk. That may be why his hearings have a connection with the subject under investigation that others lack. It's like one of his friends from AA was saying in his office, "I've walked the walk so I can talk the talk."
The hybrid "walk the talk" doesn't turn up until 1985:

Walk the Talk: Good Leaders Make Actions Match Firm's Goals Seattle Times, Aug 20, 1985, pg. C.1
They encourage, excite, teach, listen, facilitate. Their actions are consistent. Only brute consistency breeds believability: They say people are special and they treat them that way - always. You know they take their
priorities seriously because they live them clearly and visibly: They walk the talk.
I would equate "walk the talk" with "practise what you preach".

I'm not sure how (or if) I'd understand it.

I see "walk the talk" as similar to another variation that apparently became popular c. 1970: "walk it like you talk it". There was a low-budget film shot in 1968-69 and released in 1971 called You Gotta Walk It Like You Talk It Or You'll Lose That Beat , with a soundtrack by Walter Becker and Donald Fagen before they formed Steely Dan. The chorus of the title track ran, "You got to walk it just like you talk it, or be sure you're gonna lose that beat." In 1970 Lou Reed recorded an unreleased song with the Velvet Underground called "Walk and Talk It" (later to appear on his 1972 solo album, Lou Reed ) with a very similar chorus: "You better walk it as you talk it 'less you lose that beat."
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I take exception to the Subject line of this thread. I am not Baconn.

Michael Hamm NB: Of late, my e-mail address is being AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis 'spoofed' a bit. That is, spammers send (Email Removed) e-mail that seems to be from me. Please http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ realize that no spam is in fact from me.
I take exception to the Subject line of this thread. I am not Baconn. Michael Hamm

In a pig's eye!
Same here. My understanding is that it comes from the American Civil Rights movement of the 1950s. Someone who said ... and Tastifyin , but it doesn't appear in the index and a glance through the book doesn't turn it up.

I would equate "walk the talk" with "practise what you preach".

I'm not sure how (or if) I'd understand it.

I always assumed it derived from the well-known "If it talks like a duck and walks like a duck..."
Re. 'walks the talk' or 'talks the walk', I would take either as being a joke or a mistake. I expect 'talks the talk and walks the walk'.

Rob Bannister
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