+1

Hi

Are these expressions natural English?

(Iny my country we use the word petrol and not fuel)

  1. We were very low on fuel.
  2. We were running very low on fuel.
  3. We needed to fuel up.
  4. We needed to fuel up the car.
  5. As the man at the station started to pump the fuel in the car, a blast occurred.

Thanks,

Tom

+0

I agree with Genevieve.

In American English they say 'gas' instead of 'petrol'.

They also say 'I've gassed up the car', but in British English we don't say 'I've petroled up the car'.

Comments  

Hi Tom - they are correct (technically) but some would just come across as more native English if rephrased below:
3. We need to top up with fuel/ petrol.
4. We needed to refuel the car/ we needed to fill up the car with petrol
5. As the man at the station started to pump the fuel into the car, a blast occurred.

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 Rover_KE's reply was promoted to an answer.

US answer. (We don't ever say "petrol", but we know what it is.)

Mr. TomWe were very low on fuel.

This is possible for a car, but it sounds a bit like you're in an airplane or semi. Cars use gas. Semis use diesel fuel, often shortened to "diesel".

Mr. TomWe were running very low on fuel.

Same as above. "To run low on something" is fine.

Mr. TomWe needed to fuel up.

For a car, possible but unlikely. We need to get some gas. We need to stop for gas. We need to put (some) gas in the car. We need to fill the car up. There are many ways to put that.

Mr. TomWe needed to fuel up the car.

Highly unlikely, but not wrong.

Mr. TomAs the man at the station started to pump the fuel in the car, a blast occurred.

No way. "As the man at the station started to pump the gas into the car, a blast occurred."

Mr. Tom(Iny my country we use the word petrol and not fuel)

That's used in the UK, as well as diesel.

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