Hi everybody!
Which of these two sentence would you prefer as the past tense of "I do not have a car."/"I haven't got a car."?
1) I did not have a car.
2) I hadn't got a car.

Thanks for your help.
Pete
(non-native speaker)
1 2 3
Hi everybody! Which of these two sentence would you prefer as the past tense of "I do not have a car."/"I haven't got a car."? 1) I did not have a car. 2) I hadn't got a car. Thanks for your help. Pete (non-native speaker)

Both fine with 1) more formal so I guess I'd say 2) and write 1).
Hi everybody! Which of these two sentence would you prefer as the past tense of "I do not have a car."/"I haven't got a car."? 1) I did not have a car. 2) I hadn't got a car. Thanks for your help. Pete (non-native speaker)

I have a strong preference for #1.
Best Regards,

Todd H.
http://toddh.net /
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Which of these two sentence would you prefer as the past tense of "I do not have a car."/"I haven't got a car."? 1) I did not have a car. 2) I hadn't got a car. Thanks for your help. Pete (non-native speaker)

I would say "I didn't have a car"
At school in the 1950s I was taught to
avoid the use of "got"
Which of these two sentence would you prefer as the ... car. Thanks for your help. Pete (non-native speaker)

I would say "I didn't have a car" At school in the 1950s I was taught to avoid the use of "got"

Something I've never understood. 'Get' is amongst English's oldest verbs and its meaning as 'have' or 'hold' is of equally long pedigree. To deprecate its use is ridiculous. (And well done to Americans for retaining its proper past participle, 'gotten'!)
... At school in the 1950s I was taught to avoid the use of "got"

Something I've never understood. 'Get' is amongst English's oldest verbs and its meaning as 'have' or 'hold' is of equally long pedigree. To deprecate its use is ridiculous. (And well done to Americans for retaining its proper past participle, 'gotten'!)

I have been thinking about this since receiving a similar opinion here (or THERE) a few years ago. It could well have been aimed at increasing the chances of passes in French and Latin exams.
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I would say "I didn't have a car" At school in the 1950s I was taught to avoid the use of "got"

That was usually a forgettingness. . .I've got sixpence, jolly, jolly sixpence...Dear Wife.
That would have been OK but strange (I think it was from the Brits, right?). "I've got a lovely bunch."
"I got a car in trade for my old motorcycle" would have been OK.

"I got twenty dollars" would not be OK, if it means possess, have, own.

"I got a cold" might have been OK if the speaker had added "from my friend". But I think we would have preferred "I caught a cold".
Something I've never understood. 'Get' is amongst English's oldest verbs and its meaning as 'have' or 'hold' is of equally long pedigree. To deprecate its use is ridiculous. (And well done to Americans for retaining its proper past participle, 'gotten'!)

It isn't deprecation. It is a regional separation in meaning and usage.

to get- to become or to obtain, sometimes used with other verbs: To get going.
to have- to hold, possess, helping verb used with past participles.

(Of course, I am writing this from my own experience. By this time, Donna and the other good researchers and explainers on AUE are long past this discussion. . .for the umpteenth time.)
Hi everybody! Which of these two sentence would you prefer as the past tense of "I donot have a car."/"I haven't got a car."? 1) I did not have a car. 2) I hadn't got a car.

I didn't have a car.
Adrian
Which of these two sentence would you prefer as the ... car. Thanks for your help. Pete (non-native speaker)

I would say "I didn't have a car" At school in the 1950s I was taught to avoid the use of "got"

Now that's interesting.
Much of the usage of "to get" as an auxiliary (replacing "to have") is centred around the idea that it encapsulates what is said with an "unpleasant" or "saddening" feeling ("my dog got run over" is one of the examples that is always given).
It might be fun to see how many people don't like using "to get", and why i.e. to see if it's certain demographics that shun the usage, and if that's connected to the "misery" factor.
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