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Hi, there.

[1] We were getting the heck beaten out of us.

Could anyone please enlighten me on what "out of us" is doing there?

Is that the passive voice of [2]?

[2] They were beating the heck out of us.

Hmmmmmm.

Hiro

Sendai, Japan
Comments  
2 is more usual than 1:
http://www.answers.com/topic/beat-the-living-daylights-out-of

beaten until the hell (heck is an euphemism for it) gets out of youEmotion: smile
Marius Hancu2 is more usual than 1:
http://www.answers.com/topic/beat-the-living-daylights-out-of

beaten until the hell (heck is an euphemism for it) gets out of youEmotion: smile
Some would also consider it a euphemism for the sh-word.
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Now that I look more into [1] and [2], they don't seem like the same in meaning. Should the subject of [2] be "We," and what does it mean?

Hiro
Translations:

1. We were given a heavy beating. (but someone unnamed, but probably by "them")
2. They were giving us a heavy beating.

It depends whether you want to use the passive or not in translation. But similar in meaning to me.
So,

[1] We were getting the heck beaten out of us.

=

[2] They were beating the heck out of us.

?

Or, should [2] be, "We were beating the heck out of us," to be equal to [1]?

Hiro
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>Or, should [2] be, "We were beating the heck out of us," to be equal to [1]?
totally incorrect, this would mean beating ourselves

Leave them as they are. They are similar. Enough said.
1 means practically the same as 2, but the agent is present in 2.
I guess I got it now, Marius. Much appreciated. :-)

Hiro