+0
Hi,
I think we need more skilled helpers in this forum... wait a second, what do I mean? Does that mean:

We need more helpers who are skilled, or
We need helpers who are more skilled ?

In other words, does "more" refer to "helpers" or "skilled"? Can it refer to both, depending on the stress in the sentence?

Thanks.
Emotion: smile
1 2
Comments  
I think native speakers would accept the first as more likely.
Yes, it varies with the stress. That's why you should modify this sentence.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I agree.
Grammar GeekI agree.
LOL, sorry, who do you agree with? With Marius? That is, my sentence has two meanings depending on where I put the main stress?
Thanks.
Emotion: smile

Oh, sorry, Marius's post wasn't there when I started posting my response. I agree that I infer "more people" not "a higher level of skill."
Try out our live chat room.
I think we need more skilled helpers in this forum

We need helpers with more expertise

We need more helpers with expertise
Can it refer to both, depending on the stress in the sentence?
Not to both! I think you meant "Can it refer to either (one) depending on ...?"

You might include both thus: We need more more skilled helpers,but prudence would dictate a complete rephrasing. Emotion: smile

CJ
KooyeenHi,
I think we need more skilled helpers in this forum... wait a second, what do I mean? Does that mean:

We need more helpers who are skilled, or
We need helpers who are more skilled ?

In other words, does "more" refer to "helpers" or "skilled"? Can it refer to both, depending on the stress in the sentence?
Yes, it can. The sentence is ambiguous. It is perfectly good English to have a comparative (more) as part of the object (more skilled helpers) of a verb (need). If that were not true, then we need older helpers would be incorrect as well.

Cheers
CB
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more