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Are the following sentences correct?

We shouldn't always trust Google's statistics. Google indexes all the webpages including those written by non-native speakers. I know you are aware of it, I'm saying this as a precautionary measure for some unwary who accidentally stumble onto this page.
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We shouldn't always trust Google's statistics. Google indexes all the webpages, including those written by non-native speakers. I know you are aware of this, but I'm saying this as a precautionary measure to help some unwary soul who accidentally stumbles onto this page.
Thanks a lot, Mr. Micawber.
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Mister MicawberWe shouldn't always trust Google's statistics. Google indexes all the webpages, including those written by non-native speakers. I know you are aware of this, but I'm saying this as a precautionary measure to help some unwary soul who accidentally stumbles onto this page.
some should be replaced by "any". What do you say?
Actually, 'some' is better than 'any' here, since the writer evidently expects ('a precautionary measure') someone to appear.
Mister Micawber I know you are aware of this, but I'm saying this as a precautionary measure to help some unwary soul who accidentally stumbles onto this page.

Hello MM,

Your correction reminds me of something I ever wanted to know about but was reluctant to ask. May I ask what kind of impression you'd get of the following sentences, assuming that they are used in the same given context?

#1. I know you are aware of this, but I'm saying this as a precautionary measure..

#2. I know you are aware of that, but I'm saying this as a precautionary measure..

#3. I know you are aware of it, but I'm saying this as a precautionary measure..

I just want to know the first impression natives get. (For example... does #3 show that the writer is non-native?)

I'll appreciate any input. Thank you, in advance.
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All of yours are native and common. I see no practical difference between this and that; I find it a little different, in that it seems to me to refer to less complex referents-- that is why I changed it to this in the original sentence. Compare:

I'm happy, and I find it/this/that unusual.
I went to the circus and met an old friend of mine in the bleachers, and I find this/that serendipitous.

Mister MicawberAll of yours are native and common. I see no practical difference between this and that; I find it a little different, in that it seems to me to refer to less complex referents-- that is why I changed it to this in the original sentence. Compare:

I'm happy, and I find it/this/that unusual.
I went to the circus and met an old friend of mine in the bleachers, and I find this/that serendipitous.

Thank you for your help, MM! I guess I've been using only "it" in those cases, no matter to what I was referring readers, but I noticed that small change from it to this made a fairly big difference. With this, the original sentence flows much better.

I'm glad that the rule is not so complicated Emotion: smile

Have a happy Autumn Equinox Day! Hope you're enjoying cooler weather now Emotion: smile