+0
Hi teachers,

Is "away" a factor in deciding the preposition in use in this sentence?

We took his TV in his room.

We took his TV from his room.

We took away his TV from his room.

We took away his TV in his room.

Thank you.

Tinanam
1 2
Comments  
#1 could easily confused for 'into', but otherwise all forms co-exist. Or we took the TV in his room away.
Hi Mister Micawber,

Thank you for answer.

Do the following both mean the same? When you will use one and not the other?

1. We took away his TV from his room.

2. We took away his TV in his room.

Tinanam
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
If I understand aright, they are the same, and in conversation, one is about as likely as the other:

1. We took away his TV from his room.

2. We took away his TV (that was) in his room.
Hi Mister Micawber,

I understand now. Thank you so much.

Tinanam
tinanam0102Is "away" a factor in deciding the preposition in use in this sentence?
We took his TV in his room.
We took his TV from his room.
We took away his TV from his room.
We took away his TV in his room.
away is a factor. Yes. take away is a phrasal verb. You take things away from a person or take things away from a place. It seems to me, though, that we seldom try to combine both person and place in these expressions. Also, away from usually occurs together, not separated. And repeating his also seems unidiomatic.

take something away

We took away the TV. ('removed it')
We took the TV away. (same)

We took away his TV. ('deprived him of it' or 'removed it'.)
We took his TV away. (same)

We took away the TV in his room. ('removed it')

*We took the TV away in his room. (This is not correct!)

We took the TV in his room away. ('removed it')

(If you separate took from away, away can't go between a noun and the phrase that describes the noun.)
_______________

take something away from somewhere

?We took away the TV from his room. (Not very idiomatic. It separates away from from.)
We took the TV away from his room. ('put it in a more remote place')
?We took the TV in his room away from his room. (Too many room's!)

________________

take something away from someone

?We took away his/the TV from him. (Not very idiomatic. It separates away from from.)
We took his/the TV away from him. ('deprived him of it')

*We took away his/the TV in his room from him.
*We took his/the TV away in his room from him.

We took the TV in his room away from him. ('deprived him of it')
?We took his TV in his room away from him. (Too many his's!)

CJ
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi CalifJim,

Thank you for the detailed breakdown. I think the person meant to say: We took away the TV in his room. (to remove it as a punishment to his son)

We took the TV away from his room (This could simply mean we took it and put it in a remote area)

Do I understand it correctly? Thank you.

Tinanam
Yipes! I don't think you can read that much into the difference between 'take away..in' and 'take away..from', Tinanam! CJ was just setting examples. I have to go back to 'from', a preposition of movement, and 'in' a preposition of location, and that's the only difference unless context reveals any motive.
Hi Mister Micawber,

I understand. Thank you.

Tinanam
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more