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A: The train leaves in 10 minutes. Do you want to change his diaper before we board?

B: I'd just changed his diaper before we left home.

A: OK. I just wanted to make sure. Did you bring his toys?

B: Everything is in the bag, all his supplies and toys. When the train arrives, we wait until the last moment before boarding. Just to give the passengers around us a few more minutes of peace.

Are there any mistakes?

Thanks.
Comments  
A: The train leaves in 10 minutes. Do you want to change his diaper before we board?

B: I'd just changed his diaper before we left home. - I changed his nappy just before we left home

A: OK. I just wanted to make sure. Did you bring his toys?

B: Everything is in the bag, all his supplies and toys. When the train arrives, we wait until the last moment before boarding. (Just to) (That will - just my suggestion as an alternative) give the passengers around us a few more minutes (of - optional, you can leave it out) peace.
Thank you, Optilang.

I have only one question.

Is 'of' really optional? (of - optional, you can leave it out)

Can you give me other similar examples where 'of' is optional? I can't think of any. I've always thought it's mandatory.
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Is 'of' really optional? (of - optional, you can leave it out)

Can you give me other similar examples where 'of' is optional? I can't think of any. I've always thought it's mandatory.
There is a standard English expression a minute's/ a few minutes peace.
"I need a few minutes peace before I set off on my journey"
"Please, just give me a few minutes peace"
Of course you can insert 'of' in the above, but this expression is frequently used without.
It seems like 'of' may need to be replaced with an apostrophe.

a few minutes' peace
http://books.google.com.my/books?q=%22a+few+minutes+peace%22&um=1
Doesn't this follow the same pattern as in a month's time / in six months' time? An hour's notice / two hours' notice ?

By the way, the word 'diaper' is fine in AmE.
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If you do a search on google you will find it with and without the apostrophe. A grammar expert (which I'm not) will tell us if it is required. I must admit, I don't think that before today I'd ever written the phrase, but have said it many many times - in fact I'm still waiting for my few minutes' peace! Emotion: yawn
HAHA... dentist?
Don't ask - it's going from bad to worse - next meeting on 18th June with dental surgeon to perform surgery to remove a tooth - Ouch Ouch Ouch.
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