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Hi

Bono is talking about a certain guys and says: The Captain was six-foot-two, had a chin like a piece of Wedgwood and the creamy voice of Empire. Somebody told us he had been in the British Army and served in Intelligence as an undercover agent in Northern Ireland during the Troubles. I remember thinking: The Captain pretending to be a Paddy? Not a chance.

--- I'm just wondering if he's comparing his chin to the porcelain/china (Wedgwood)? What about "Empire"? I've found there is a paint called Empire Emotion: smile
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Newguest--- I'm just wondering if he's comparing his chin to the porcelain/china (Wedgwood)? What about "Empire"? I've found there is a paint called Empire Emotion: smile
He's saying that the captain had a strong chin and commanding voice. You can find lots of pictures of people with strong chins by doing a Google image search. Here's a start.
"Wedgwood" refers to the ceramics made by the British firm of that name. "Empire" refers to the British Empire, now defunct. It seems here that he's associating both these things with traditional (or old-fashioned) British values.
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Hi

So he had a chin like a piece of ceramics made by Wedgwood, which, according to RayH, means that he had a strong chin and his creamy voice resembled British Empire (was commanding)?

cheers
I don't understand it as meaning a physically strong chin (particularly), since ceramics are brittle. It could mean a smooth, well-modelled, or chiselled chin -- how a traditional British officer is supposed to look (reinforced by the idea that Wedgwood is a very old and traditional company).

A "voice of Empire" implies (to me) an old-fashioned upper-class British accent. That would make it particularly difficult for him to pass as a "Paddy" (Irishman).
I understand. Thanks!
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So, it's OK to say that he had the upper-class voice like someone living in the British Empire?

cheers
NewguestSo, it's OK to say that he had the upper-class voice like someone living in the British Empire?

It's not so much someone living in the British Empire, more the sort of voice typical of the people in the British establishment who administered the British Empire (in the early 20th century, say) -- either officials in the civil service or military officers. These people typically came from upper-class families.

This is my understanding of the connotations.
I think it's clear to me now. Thanks.
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