In alt.english.usage , we have been discussing the possible origin of "Well, doggies!" "Way doggies!" "Hoo, doggies!" I figured it was a variation of "Oh God!" based upon the report in AHD4 that "doggone" is an "Alteration of Scots dagone, alteration of *goddamn.*" I said "Perhaps 'Dagnabbit!' contains the same 'dag.'" I associate "Well, doggies!" with the hill people of Tennessee. It was, of course, used by Jed Clampett in *The Beverly Hillbillies,* a character from Bugtussle, Tennessee. That state had a lot of Scots Irish immigrants (aka "Scotch Irish"), and I figured that a distortion of "God" in "Oh God!" had occurred in their dialect as that which had occurred in Scots with "dagone."
Tony Cooper is of the opinion that "Well, doggies!" comes from the term *dogie,* used in the Old West for a motherless calf.

So I did some research on the matter. The OED2 gives for the etymology of "dog-gone" the following: "Generally taken as a deformation of the profane God damn : cf. dang, darn. But some think the original form was dog on it, to be compared with pox on it! etc.; Cf. Dog sb.1 17j. (See also Sc. Nat. Dict. s. v. dag. )"
I took a look at *The Scottish National Dictionary,* Edinburgh: The Scottish National Dictionary Association, Limited, (C) 1952. From its entry for "dag": "DAG, Deg, Dig, Dog, int. Also dags, dogs. A mild form of oath ; used as an imprecation = confound !" It did not have "dagone," but it had "dagon't" and "digont" and used "dagon" in an example. It also mentioned "dags (dogs) rabbit it" and gave "dogsrabbit it" in an example. (See my comment about "dagnabbit" given above.) The etymology it gave was "Origin obscure. Prob. a corruption of God ( damn, dang, etc.). Some variations are due to confusion with dog : cf. American slang dog-doge, dog on, doggoned it, id. (D.A.E.)" I was unable to find out what "D.A.E." stood for.
I checked the Dictionary of the American West* by Winfred Blevins, Facts on File, (C) 1993, and *Western Words: A Dictionary of the American West by Ramon F. Adams, New Edition, Revised and Enlarged. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, (C) 1968. I wanted to see if either one had "dogie" or "doggie" as an interjection. They did not, but a comment in Adams's book pointed out to a confusion between "dogie" and "doggie" Tony Cooper had thought that such a confusion had occurred with "Well, doggies!" that it had been "Well, dogies!" From the entry for "dogie": "The term (dogie) became popular through western songs, though a great percentage of the singers pronounce it doggie, as if they were singing of a pup."

I then checked the Dictionary of American Regional English ("DARE"), Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, (C) 1991.
(quote)
doggies, by* exclam Also by dogies Cf *dog n1 B7, *dog v 6,* and DS NN6-9
1956* Moody Home Ranch 20 CO (Colorado) (as of 1911), "Fifty miles, huhh!" he snorted, "By dogies." *c1970* Halpert Coll. *wKY, wTN (western Kentucky, western Tennessee), By doggies = a mild oath.

(end quote)
I tried finding what "Halpert Coll." stood for, but did not locate in in DARE. I expect it is a book by Herbert Halpert, a folklorist who studied, among other things, Appalachian dialectal usages.
DARE also shows "dog" used "in var euphem exclams, esp dog bite (it), ~ take (it) and varr It gives for the etymology "Euphem for God. " and identifies the use as South and South Midland.
Besides all of the above, I also learned that "doggy" has been used to mean "Dashing, stylish, smart." (source, OED2 entry for "dog"). This could conceivably be a source of "Well, doggies!"

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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In alt.english.usage , we have been discussing the possible origin of "Well, doggies!" "Way doggies!" "Hoo, doggies!" I figured it ... distortion of "God" in "Oh God!" had occurred in their dialect as that which had occurred in Scots with "dagone."

Who is this Jed Clampett? The character Jed Clampett was played by Buddy Ebsen. Buddy was born in Illinois and grew up in - surprise! - Florida. His family moved to Orlando when he was 10. I know people whose parents went to school with Christian (known as Buddy) Ebsen. He attended University of Florida.
His lines were written by a crew of writers. We don't really know if any of them were even in Tennessee, let alone grew up there. The phrase spoken by Buddy could have been written by someone from Brooklyn (Bigger than Bugtussle but still not a city) New York for all we know.
All that said, I don't disagree that it might be a term from Tennessee, and a term that evolved from some Scots Irish immigrant descendants. I just have trouble making this association because an actor, dancer, and former pre-med student uttered the line in a television sitcom.
Tony Cooper is of the opinion that "Well, doggies!" comes from the term *dogie,* used in the Old West for a motherless calf.

Yes, I think that's the more likely source. And, as I wrote in the other group, I think it's likely that Tennesseans picked up the term from Gene Autry Saturday oater matinees and his continual wailing of "Git along little dogies". It's conjecture on my part, but that's what I think.
In alt.english.usage , we have been discussing the possible origin ... dialect as that which had occurred in Scots with "dagone."

Who is this Jed Clampett? The character Jed Clampett was played by Buddy Ebsen. Buddy was born in Illinois and ... with Christian (known as Buddy) Ebsen. He attended University of Florida. His lines were written by a crew of writers.

That's why Ray said that it was Jed Clampett who used the word, not Buddy Ebsen.
We don't really know if any of them were even in Tennessee, let alone grew up there. The phrase spoken by Buddy could have been written by someone from Brooklyn

You have a point.
(Bigger than Bugtussle but still not a city) New York for all we know.

I believe Brooklyn is the 4th biggest city in the country. (Although it may have been passed by now by some others in the last 25 years.)
All that said, I don't disagree that it might be a term from Tennessee, and a term that evolved from ... have trouble making this association because an actor, dancer, and former pre-med student uttered the line in a television sitcom.

Tony Cooper is of the opinion that "Well, doggies!" comes from the term *dogie,* used in the Old West for a motherless calf.

Yes, I think that's the more likely source. And, as I wrote in the other group, I think it's likely ... and his continual wailing of "Git along little dogies". It's conjecture on my part, but that's what I think.

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In alt.english.usage , we have been discussing the possible origin of"Well, doggies!" "Way doggies!" "Hoo, doggies!" I figured it was ... been used tomean "Dashing, stylish, smart." (source, OED2 entry for "dog"). This could conceivably be a source of "Well, doggies!"

If you get your fur coat from China, you can really put on the dog. Thank you for the definitive rundown, which I couldn't bring myself to snip. I still think it's an avoidance of "God", though. Blasphemy back when was a more serious thing than we can easily bellyfeel. CDB
Is the term generally use doggies or dogies in plural?

What I've always heard is "Way, doggie!" (singilar) - but I'm I'm from the Eastern side of the pond.
Ally
Is the term generally use doggies or dogies in plural? What I've always heard is "Way, doggie!" (singilar) - but I'm I'm from the Eastern side of the pond.

I've never heard "dogie" used in any interjection, and I don't think I've heard "doggie" used either. I've heard "Well, doggies!" expressed by Jed Clampett, a character from Tennessee in The Beverly Hillbillies,* and I think I've heard it elsewhere (probably in the movies), but I can't point to any particular instance. I found on the Internet many examples of "Hoo, doggies!" with various numbers of "o"s in "hoo." I did find that example from the *Dictionary of Regional American English of the interjections "By doggies!" and "By dogies!"
(quote)
doggies, by* exclam Also by dogies Cf *dog n1 B7, *dog v 6,* and DS NN6-9
1956* Moody Home Ranch 20 CO (Colorado) (as of 1911), "Fifty miles, huhh!" he snorted, "By dogies." *c1970* Halpert Coll. *wKY, wTN (western Kentucky, western Tennessee), By doggies = a mild oath.

(end quote)
I was looking for any example of "dogie" in an interjection, and did not find any.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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If you get your fur coat from China, you can really put on the dog.

OED2 had, in definition 17.p. under the entry for the noun "dog," "to put on dog." It was defined as "to assume pretentious airs, colloq. Hence dog (ellipt.) pretentiousness, 'side'." Definition 17.q. is like a dog's dinner : used of someone or something dressed or arranged in an ostentatiously smart or flashy manner."
I had never seen this particular take on the expression, which I would usually take to mean simply "to dress up," as for a special occasion, and I had never seen the expression used without the article: "to put on the dog." Michael Quinion, in his World Wide Words column at

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-put1.htm
says that he himself learned it as "to put on dog," and he gives a possible origin for it (from the post-Civil War custom of ladies having as pets lap dogs), although he seems pretty skeptical about it.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Is the term generally use doggies or dogies in plural? ... but I'm I'm from the Eastern side of the pond.

I've never heard "dogie" used in any interjection, and I don't think I've heard "doggie" used either. I've heard "Well, ... Hillbillies,* and I think I've heard it elsewhere (probably in the movies), but I can't point to any particular instance.

Let me reiterate that I don't question the source of the expression to be what you have come up with. I'm stuck, though, on using Jed Clampett's character as some sort of verification. Sitcoms, especially ones like "Beverly Hillbillies", are not known to have researchers that check for accuracy in dialect, accent, expressions, costumes, or damned near anything.
It could be that one of the writers grew up in the hills of Tennessee and used a line that his grandmother used when she had her teeth in. It's just as likely, though, that the writer was from the Greater Laurel vastland and heard the expression from a clam digger cousin that thought Tennessee was in the wild, wild West. Kind of a Areffian geography mover.
Please, if you want to give credence to your theory, abandon Jeb's character as an example. It's like using Tony Curtis's dialog to verify how they spoke in King Arthur's Court.
I've never heard "dogie" used in any interjection, and I ... the movies), but I can't point to any particular instance.

Let me reiterate that I don't question the source of the expression to be what you have come up with. ... a Areffian geography mover. Please, if you want to give credence to your theory, abandon Jeb's character as an example.

That's Jed, Coop. Jeb's character is the one in Flo'ida.
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