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Hi teachers. I would like to know if the phrase 'went out the window' is used correctly here?

I had told myself repeatedly to be cool no matter what, but when it was finally my turn to say hi to him, my preparation went straight out the window and I started shaking and crying uncontrollably.

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Yes, that's OK.

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In AmE yes, but in BrE it requires of, as in my preparation went straight out of the window.

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BillJIn AmE yes, but in BrE it requires of, as in my preparation went straight out of the window.

Why?

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anonymous
BillJIn AmE yes, but in BrE it requires of, as in my preparation went straight out of the window.

Why?

Because some varieties of English like AmE (sometimes), allow an NP complement of "out".


Edit: CJ mentioned in his comment that the British newspapers The Guardian and the Telegraph use it without 'of' often enough. It's true that it does occur, though it's patchy. I found this gem where there's inconsistency in the same article:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2019/06/20/chairman-follows-chief-exec-door-woodford-backed-allied-minds/

Notice that the title says "out the door", but in the very first line of the article it says "out of the door"!

BillJin BrE it requires of

Hmm. The Guardian and the Telegraph use it without 'of' often enough.

CJ