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The diplomat went rogue, giving unapproved interview.

Is "rogue" a complement in the sentence above? And if so, can I say The diplomat is rogue?

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anonymousThe diplomat went rogue, giving an unapproved interview.
anonymousIs "rogue" a complement in the sentence above?

Yes. I'd say it's a complement of 'went'. That is, it completes the meaning of the verb 'went'.

went rogue, went crazy, went berserk, went mad

anonymousAnd if so, can I say The diplomat is rogue?

No. The usage of 'rogue' you quoted is restricted to the idiom "to go rogue".

I'm not aware of any predicative usage of 'rogue'. It seems to be uniquely an attributive adjective (rogue states, a rogue cop, etc., not The states are rogue or The cop is rogue.)

CJ

Comments  
anonymousIs "rogue" a complement in the sentence above?

It looks like a noun to me. This is an unusual structure with "go" but natural and well known. The only other example I can think of is "to go native", to adopt the customs of the foreign land you find yourself in.

anonymousAnd if so, can I say The diplomat is rogue?

No, no more than you could say he is native.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

I thought of another one: "go ape".