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If I had known you would be late, I would've waited for you.

I think this is correct.

Can I say without changing the meaning,

If I had known you were late, I would've waited for you.

I think the fact that you were late is what the speaker already know right now, so the past simple could be used in the if-clause. It could be casual spoken English, though.

Thanks
LiJ
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Yes it was a typo. I"ve been having some problems with my C key, and now apparently my N key. I have to really whack it, and then sometimes I get 3 of them. Grrr.
Hi GG,
look what I found! Emotion: wink
Grammar Geek If I'd have known you were going to be so late, I never would have waited for you
That can't be a typo, although it could be a Freudian slip... if you really never say it that way, not even if tortured. Emotion: stick out tongue Seriously, do you use that structure yourself? I come across "I wish I would have done it" or "If I would have..." pretty often, I think.
PS: I know it's wrong, and I don't like it or use it myself. Don't worry. Emotion: wink
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Sorry, what's wrong with "If I would have known"? Yes, I do use it. That wasn't a typo. What do you say "If Ida known"?

(In one of my other ones, I had typed "know" instead of "known." Man, these little key caps are causing me all sorts of trauma now. The B is next and when your name is Barbara that's a problem!)
1. If I had known you would be late, I would have waited for you.
2. If I had known you were late, I would have waited for you.

Both sound fine to me; though they mean slightly different things.

"Late" is ambiguous: it can mean "arriving after the appointed time" (sentence #1), or "being likely to arrive after the appointed time" (#2).

You are "late" in the first sense when you arrive for your 10 o'clock interview at 10.30.

You are "late" in the second sense when you miss your 9.35 train to the same interview and realise that the next train isn't till 10.05.

Thus in sentence #1, the speaker imagines a point in the past where he might have known about the addressee's likely arrival time.

In #2, however, the speaker imagines a point in the past where he might have known about e.g. the delay to the addressee's train.

Best wishes,

MrP
Thanks, MrP.

Wonderful expression.
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LiveinjapanIf I had known you would be late, I would've waited for you.
Correct, but I prefer If I had known you were [going to be late / running late], I would've waited (a little longer) for you.
CJ
Grammar GeekSorry, what's wrong with "If I would have known"?
ESL learners are usually taught this only as a lower register way of saying If I had known. They are usually told not to use would after if. At least that's my story, and I'm sticking to it! Emotion: smile

CJ
CalifJimIf I had known you were [going to be late / running late], I would've waited (a little longer) for you.
Thanks, CJ.

That sounds better to me, too.
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And my original, that Kooyeen found such mirth in, was If I'd known... which could be either If I had known or If I would have known.

I still don't know what's wrong with it.

(Is that really "lower register"?)
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