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If I had known you would be late, I would've waited for you.

I think this is correct.

Can I say without changing the meaning,

If I had known you were late, I would've waited for you.

I think the fact that you were late is what the speaker already know right now, so the past simple could be used in the if-clause. It could be casual spoken English, though.

Thanks
LiJ
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Comments  
This is what I think. "If I had known" put you back in time to the point where you didn't know she would/wouldn't come. I hope this makes sense to you.

So, I would choose the first one.
Hi LiJ

If I had known you would be late, I would've waited for you. (correct)

The other sentence is not correct.

The fact is that you had not known he would be late, and so you had not waited for him.
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Thanks, New2 and YL.

I agree with you. I wonder if natives say 'you were late' in very casual spoken English.
I'm just having trouble making sense of this at all. If I'd have known you were going to be so late, I never would have waited for you -- now that makes sense. If I'd know you were going to be only a little late, I would have waited for you.

But the way this is written, I didn't wait for you (at all). So your being late would have made me wait? How odd - since back when I thought you were going to be on time, I still didn't wait.
Grammar Geek
I'm just having trouble making sense of this at all. If I'd have known you were going to be so late, I never would have waited for you -- now that makes sense. If I'd know you were going to be only a little late, I would have waited for you.

But the way this is written, I didn't wait for you (at all). So your being late would have made me wait? How odd - since back when I thought you were going to be on time, I still didn't wait.

I understand what you mean. Thanks, GG.
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If I'd know you were going to be only a little late, I would have waited for you.

Is the highlighted phase short for If I would know or there's a typo and it's short for If I had known?
>If I'd know you were going to be only a little late, I would have waited for you.
If I would know.
Wrong here.
New2grammarIf I'd know you were going to be only a little late, I would have waited for you.

Is the highlighted phase short for If I would know or there's a typo and it's short for If I had known?

If I'd known you were going to be only a little late, I would have waited for you. (I'd is the short form for I would and I had.)
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