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Hi again, this one is a bit tricky.

Context: A man wakes up and finds out that the alarm clock is not working. He wakes his wife, saying:

a) We've overslept. b) We overslept.

I'd go for a) but what if the action (ie oversleeping) doesn't have any negative effects or the effects can still be undone? Isn't b) more appropriate in this context?
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I'd go for the present perfect. "Look!/Wake up! We've overslept": the focus is on the present result.
PastsimpleHi again, this one is a bit tricky.

Context: A man wakes up and finds out that the alarm clock is not working. He wakes his wife, saying:

a) We've overslept. b) We overslept.

I'd go for a) but what if the action (ie oversleeping) doesn't have any negative effects or the effects can still be undone? Isn't b) more appropriate in this context?

I'd go for a). It's very recent. If they've overslept, then their schedule will be affected in some way.
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PieanneI'd go for the present perfect. "Look!/Wake up! We've overslept": the focus is on the present result.

Yes that's what I've pointed out but what if there was no real need at all to get up at the time the alarm clock had been set to?

If you say "we overslept" in such a context, your wife might ask "when did we oversleep?"

A sentence in the simple past makes sense only when your listener knows the time in which the said event happened. So "I overslept this morning" makes sense even if you utter it suddenly, but "I overslept" without any time adverbial makes no sense when it is suddenly uttered.

On the other hand, "I've overslept" makes sense even if you utter it suddenly without addition of time adverbials. It is because, if you use the present perfect tense, your listener knows that what you are talking about is an event happened in the immediate past.

paco
Paco2004If you say "we overslept" in such a context, your wife might ask "when did we oversleep?"
My take is:

Since we are both in bed and I've just woken her she'd say "when did we oversleep?" only if she was joking.

I'm afraid we might need advice from a native speaker here.
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I am sorry that I am not a native speaker.

paco
Both options sound just fine to me.
One BrE native speaker once told me that this "oversleeping" question was a tricky one and that both were possible in appropriate contexts, with "We've overslept" being the much more frequent version. He said I needed to take the following into account: "can it [= the damage done] be undone?", "is it [= the fact that we('ve) overslept] serious?"....

To be honest, I use present perfect in writing. In real life "oversleeping" situations, I use past simple. I don't know why.
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