I come from a small country, new EU member state, Slovenia. We just got european currency unit, Euro (by the way...I hate it, because now we have to carry around all these coins. When we had our previous currency unit called Tolar, we used very few coins). But enough about that...i have somethng else on my mind...

Well, I just want to know, what do people from all around the world think about us? Do you even know, where are we? When you hear "Slovenia", what is the first thought, that runy through your mind?
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I know where Slovenia is, but I know very little about it. When I think of it I think of the whole Bosnia, Croatia, Serb, Yugoslavian conflicts that split eastern europe into all those little countries, but I have no idea if Slovenia was ever even a part of that, I just assumed it was because of its size.
Yes, we were also a part of Yugoslavia-along with Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Montenegro and Macedonia. Since early 90-s we are independent country and since 2004 we are EU member state.

War, which tore us apart didn't impact us in such way it impacted Bosnia, Montenegro, Serbia and Croatia. We had some problems just beyond the borders and Serbian aircrafts bombed some of our transmitters, but it was only a fragment of all the horrors, that happened "down there".
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I'm nigh ignorant about Slovenian culture. My spontaneous opinion about Slovenians is that they are not that slavic in origin. Am I right?

Because I know of Serbians and Croatians, also of Montenegro but ,seriously, nothing about Slovenians.

Could you tell me a little about your language please? All I ask is just a little comparison with Serb-Croatian. Are they similar or you speak precisely a different language?

I also wonder the peoples general attitude towards strangers but that could be a new topic.
Actually you are quite right about slavic thing. We are slavic, but most of us are not aware of that.

We speak slovenian language. In comparison to serb-croatian language it is very different. For someone, who doesn't understand any of these languages, they will sound similar. Like japan and chinese language sound similar for us, who don't know anything about chinese and japan.

But on the other hand we can understand each other quite easilly. I once spoke to Czech girl and she said, that she can understand a lot, if I speak croatian language, but nothing if I speak slovenian. Maybe we can compare some words in your language and in our language-so we will tease our friends with some statements.Emotion: smile

General attitude towards strangers in Slovenia is quite complex. We like people from Western, Central and North Europe, but not people from South Europe (There are some exceptions, like me. I don't care where someone comes from as long as his attitude towards me is OK.) I don't have idea, why it is like that. Maybe because of war...but this does not appologise anything. The fact is, that generally speaking we are quite nice people.Emotion: smile

Last few years we also have something from Turkey-a lot of kebab (I don't know, if it is correctly spelled). And I like it very much.Emotion: wink
SoulManActually you are quite right about slavic thing. We are slavic, but most of us are not aware of that.

We speak slovenian language. In comparison to serb-croatian language it is very different. For someone, who doesn't understand any of these languages, they will sound similar. Like japan and chinese language sound similar for us, who don't know anything about chinese and japan.

But on the other hand we can understand each other quite easilly. I once spoke to Czech girl and she said, that she can understand a lot, if I speak croatian language, but nothing if I speak slovenian. Maybe we can compare some words in your language and in our language-so we will tease our friends with some statements.Emotion: smile

General attitude towards strangers in Slovenia is quite complex. We like people from Western, Central and North Europe, but not people from South Europe (There are some exceptions, like me. I don't care where someone comes from as long as his attitude towards me is OK.) I don't have idea, why it is like that. Maybe because of war...but this does not appologise anything. The fact is, that generally speaking we are quite nice people.Emotion: smile

Last few years we also have something from Turkey-a lot of kebab (I don't know, if it is correctly spelled). And I like it very much.Emotion: wink
Thanks for your efforts they are quiet illuminating. I had no knowledge of Slovenian but now I have an idea at least.

Kebab is arabic we spell it kebap ( "p" is pronounced as it is in "put") and you have a good taste of gourmet I might say Emotion: big smile

Maybe I'm asking for too much but could you tell me some words of Croatian in Slovenian, please?

Like Hvala,Dobriy den,pozdrav,zbogom et cetera what or how much you see reasonable.
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Slovenian Croatian English
Hvala Hvala Thank you
Koliko je ura? Koliko je sati? What time is it?
Dober dan Dobar dan Good afternoon
Kam greš? Kamo ideš? Where are you going?
Nasvidenje Doviđenja (zbogom) Good bye

That would be something for beginning. If you have anymore questions-go ahead.Emotion: wink
I'm from Slovenia too Emotion: smile
SoulManSlovenian Croatian English
Hvala Hvala Thank you
Koliko je ura? Koliko je sati? What time is it?
Dober dan Dobar dan Good afternoon
Kam greš? Kamo ideš? Where are you going?
Nasvidenje Doviđenja (zbogom) Good bye

You also say:
SoulManWe speak slovenian language. In comparison to serb-croatian language it is very different. For someone, who doesn't understand any of these languages, they will sound similar. Like japan and chinese language sound similar for us, who don't know anything about chinese and japan.
First, Japanese and Chinese are two languages belonging to different language families - as different from each other as each is from Slovenian, although there are many Chinese words in Japanese. To me they do not sound anything like each other.

The examples you quote indicate that Slovenian is closely related to Croatian. Indeed, I learned Russian and "dober dan" is recognisable as "dobriy dyen'" and "nasvidenje" is not that far off "do svidanya". The fact that there may be difficulty in understanding does not stop the languages being close - there are many dialects of English that I have some difficulty in following. Are you not emphasising the differences, rather than the similarities?
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