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Ok, I took that test too, even though that doesn't make much sense to me, I really don't practice spoken English much yet. Anyway:

First result: Midland

...and after realizing that I'm likely to pronounce "cot" and "caught" the same...

Second result: Western

Northern. And since I grew up in "upstate" New York, that's fairly accurate. But I still drink "Caw-fee," my only real New Yorker-ism.

It should have asked things about "peetzer" for "pizza" or "Warshington, D.C." And it seems the "yankee" accent was just too much for them - I wonder how a Bostoner or Mainer would have been scored, since there were no "r" questions.
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>> "Caw-fee," my only real New Yorker-ism. <<

Well, out west we sometimes drink "caw-fee", and other times "cah-fee". It's all the same to us.
Hey, I saw you all talking about this quiz in another thread and I was curious to try; my result is:

Northeastern: your accent is basically what people speak with around the Tri-State area (New York City, north Jersey, Connecticut) and Rhode Island. If New York City is the greatest city in the world, it's not too much of a stretch to say you have the greatest accent in the world!

Not bad thinking that I will probably go to Boston Emotion: stick out tongue, but too bad considering that I'm trying to learn British English Emotion: tongue tied

(Kooyeen, now I know where you got do-dew Emotion: wink )
Mid-Atlantic for me. I guess that shouldn't be too surprising, though, since I grew up close to Philadelphia: Emotion: big smile

"You have the accent of Philadelphia, south Jersey, and Baltimore. Everyone around there knows what a Philly accent is but not enough outsiders can ever recognize it."

On the other hand, it's now 30 years since I last lived near Philly. Emotion: surprise
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Well, first of all, I think that test is not accurate or completely reliable. Everybody sounds American according to that test, since no other results are possible. I mean, if my mother took that test, the result would probably be "Northeastern" or "Mid-Atlantic"... but actually the result should be "Strong Italian",or "Excuse me, is that English?" ,or "What are you talking about?" Emotion: stick out tongue
So, my result was "Midland", with a tendency to "Western", but that doesn't mean I really sound that way...

However, who cares, that's just a test, it's fun... and I was wondering, does anyone have a western accent (according to that test)?
My Result: Northern

Your accent is Northern, which used to be the media standard in the '50s and '60s. Your accent could either be Inland Northern (Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo) or the more broadcasting-friendly Upstate NY/Western New England accent. If you have the Inland North accent, outsiders probably ask you a lot if you're from Chicago or Wisconsin.
Surprise, surprise...

Your Result: Western

This is what they speak in the western half of the US, which is a pretty huge area. Like Midland, it is considered a neutral accent, so most people you meet probably think you don't have an accent (unless you're from the California coast).
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@YoungCalifornian's result
>> Surprise, surprise...

Your Result: Western

This is what they speak in the western half of the US, which is a pretty huge area. Like Midland, it is considered a neutral accent, so most people you meet probably think you don't have an accent (unless you're from the California coast). <<


Well, I think the West could be broken up a little bit further: the test should ask questions like, "how do you say tomorrow? tomahrrow or tomohrow?" "Do you have the same kind of vowel for 'bag' and 'bad'?" "Do pull and pole sound the same?" Although I'm not quite sure of the exact boundaries.
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