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(to a shopkeeper) What are your opening hours (=during what period of time your shop is open)?

I think the use of "opening" is correct but I don't know why I find 'opened' more correct choice there. Further, I couldn't find a suitable sense to fit the context. Please help.

opening:
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/opening
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It sounds like British English.

In the US, it would sound strange. We ask:

What are your hours of operation?
What are your store's hours? (less formal)

What time do you open? How late are you open?
Thanks. I like 'operaton hours' better.

I can see it does sound strange to you but I believe you still consider it correct. Going back to my original question: Is using 'opened' allowed and why is 'opening' the right choice when the dictionary doesn't seem to mention such sense? Please guide me.
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Jackson6612Going back to my original question: Is using 'opened' allowed and why is 'opening' the right choice when the dictionary doesn't seem to mention such sense?
The key is usage. If people in England talk about "opening hours," and it is regularly used in their newspapers, fiction, magazines, etc. then it is legitmate usage. The only thing that dictionaries do is to record mainstream usage. The dictionaries (at least English ones) do not invent language at all, they document it. In documenting it, they have to make choices about what examples to include. The Oxford English dictionary (unabridged) is truely amazing, because it not only documents modern usage, but historical usage as well.

So, you say, how did you verify the difference between BrE and AmE regarding the usage of the phrase "opening hours"?

I used two very handy resources, one for AmE and another for BrE.
In the British Corpus, I got many citations like these:

-- Opening hours are Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm
---More funds were required generally for longer opening hours ;
--- Friends agree that most museums in the private sector have opening hours that suit the wishes of the public

In the American Corpus, though, results were markedly different. There were fewer usages (even though the database is much larger), and most of these were not related to shops and businesses:

-- in the opening hours of April 9, when the American Army controlled Baghdad..
-- This is where I spent the opening hours of the conflict...

It is an interesting way to compare the regional / national differences.

Regards,
A-Emotion: stars
Thank you very much for this informative reply.
AlpheccaStarsThe key is usage. If people England talk about "opening hours," and it is regularly used in their newspapers, fiction, magazines, etc. then it is legitmate usage. The only thing that dictionaries do is to record mainstream usage. The dictionaries (at least English ones) do not invent language at all, they document it. In documenting it, they have to make choices about what examples to include. The Oxford English dictionary (unabridged) is truely amazing, because it not only documents modern usage, but historical usage as well.
Isn't it the same with dictionaries of other languages? They also document, catalogue only the popular senses, usage, and make compromises to include set expressions such as idioms and idiomatic phrases, etc. Perhaps, you aren't sure of the answer to this as your reply suggests ,"at least English ones". The learner dictionaries are good in that they include a lot of set expressions to reflect the language as used by natives.

I haven't used OED. I had an electronic copy of M-W's unabridged. I don't really know if it was good, I used it rarely. I think OED has to be more amazing because it's older and partly due to the fact that AmE is a younger variety.

Suppose you are given a choice to invent a phrase to convey the sense of 'operation hours'. Between 'opening hours' and 'opened hours', which one would you choose?

Best wishes
Jack
Jackson6612Suppose you are given a choice to invent a phrase to convey the sense of 'operation hours'. Between 'opening hours' and 'opened hours', which one would you choose?Best wishesJack

As a non-native, I'd choose "opened hours". But even that is not good as "opened" modifies hours, which obviously can't be right. So I just assume that there's an implied store/shop between "opened" and "hours".
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Jackson6612Isn't it the same with dictionaries of other languages?
France has had an academic academy for defining "true pure French." I'm not sure about other languages, and I don't know if the academy's power over the populace has waned.
There are many languages that do not have written dictionaries.
Jackson6612Suppose you are given a choice to invent a phrase to convey the sense of 'operation hours'. Between 'opening hours' and 'opened hours', which one would you choose?
Neither. I would invent something more obvious:

What are your open hours? (The shop is open from 7 to 9)

That is better than the one other choice: What are your hours of openness?
This has somewhat of a transcendental ring to it.
I have visited many countries during the last few years, and I am still not used to seeing "opening hours". It apparently is very common, even if in the States we often see only "Open 9-5".
Hi, I'm from England so i want to say what we use for it. " opening hours " is correct Emotion: smile

-Alyson M. S.-
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