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I've a phrase "bouncing baby clones". It is actually song name. I looked im my dictionary, but for word "bounce" there is many very differrent definitions from "jump" to "boasting". So, I want to know what its phrase really means. Thank you [:^)]
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Hi,

a bouncing baby = a healthy, vigorous baby

Clive
AnonymousSo, I want to know what its phrase really means

It's a play on the expression "bouncing baby boy/girl" meaning "vigorous" or "healthy."


See this at Answers.com.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Often moms and dads will sit down in a chair, and put their baby (one to three years old) on their knee facing them. The parent then moves one leg quickly up and down. The baby "jumps" up and down too with the leg. Babies love this and usually they start laughing and squealing in delight. If the parent stops, they try to get the parent to do it again and again.

This little game is called "bouncing the baby".
We can bounce other things too - mainly balls. Basketball is all about bouncing the ball, but they call this "dribbling"
This is exactly about song could be. I understood what you mean, we have this game in our country too Emotion: smile. Thank you for detailed answer. It's really clears the situation Emotion: smile
An energetic baby.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Why you think that
bouncING baby = a healthy, vigorous baby?

This is obvious verb, means process.
So, I think AlpheccaStars 's version is most accurate and exactly match whole phrase.

Btw,
match whole phrase
or
match with whole phrase
or
else?
Hi,

Why you think that

bouncING baby = a healthy, vigorous baby?

'Bouncing baby' is a phrase. You need to use it in a full sentence to make sense of it.

Mary has a new bouncing baby boy. Here, 'bouncing' is an adjective, with the meaning I gave above.

Mary is bouncing her baby on her knee. Here, 'bouncing' is the main verb, forming part of the Present Continuous tense.

Bouncing her baby on her knee is one of Mary's favourite games. Here, 'bouncing' is a gerund.

Best wishes, Clive