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It is easy to over emphasise the differences between "standard" Peninsular Spanish and any variety of Latin American Spanish. The similarities outweigh the differences by about 1000 to 1. I would not even classify them as dialects of the same language, but rather as varieties. The degree of homogeneity is remarkable. You will in fact hear more dialects of Spanish if you travel from Asturias to Andalucia than if you travel from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego.
How can you say that latin america is not similar to spain. Where do you think the latin american countries got their religion, language, culture, food, music and their racial/ethnic makeup of the people; from spain. And most of the people of latin america are of spanish ancestry and something else. The only reason there are slums and barrios is because the people of latin america who are mestizos and indians are segregated from the rest and are forced to live in poor conditions while the "white" spanish elite control everything and live in their nice houses.
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Anonymous you are oversimplifying. Spanish political control of South America had ceased by 1830. I have no idea of the numbers, but there are millions of people descended from the races who inhabited pre-Colombian South America. The Europeans who migrated to South America came from many different countries - see here: http://www.let.leidenuniv.nl/history/migration/chapter53.html

Whilst there is inevitably some overlap, language and culture are separate.

You also seem to be forgetting Portuguese.

Argentinians have been described as Spanish speaking Italians living in French cities and who think they are English gentlemen!
I also think that Mexico and spain have different culture and history but I also believe that the world is one and all countries have something to do with the others. maybe, Mexico has something more to share with spain that greece, for example. Even Italy has a lot to do with Spain: infact, as I'm from naples, most of the words in neapolitan dialect derivate from spanish.

In my opinion, I've beenj to Mexico and to Tenerife (wich also is separate now I think from Spain): I prefer spanish language spoken in mexico, I don't like how spanish from spain pronounce the "s". I also think that they talk too fast as, for me, people from mexico talk in a very fluent and "musical" way. In particular, as I've never been to Spain but only to Tenerife, I must say that I've heard a very particular spanish language as I've noticed that Tinerfenos don't pronounce the final "s" and sometimes I've found very difficult to me to understand them whilst I was really able to talk in a fluent spanish in mexico. Really don't know how it's possible. Maybe, 'cause, at last, they're TWO different languages.
Little CloudI also think that Mexico and spain have different culture and history but I also believe that the world is one and all countries have something to do with the others. maybe, Mexico has something more to share with spain that greece, for example. Even Italy has a lot to do with Spain: infact, as I'm from naples, most of the words in neapolitan dialect derivate from spanish.

In my opinion, I've beenj to Mexico and to Tenerife (wich also is separate now I think from Spain): I prefer spanish language spoken in mexico, I don't like how spanish from spain pronounce the "s". I also think that they talk too fast as, for me, people from mexico talk in a very fluent and "musical" way. In particular, as I've never been to Spain but only to Tenerife, I must say that I've heard a very particular spanish language as I've noticed that Tinerfenos don't pronounce the final "s" and sometimes I've found very difficult to me to understand them whilst I was really able to talk in a fluent spanish in mexico. Really don't know how it's possible. Maybe, 'cause, at last, they're TWO different languages.

Your comment is funny.

First of all, Tenerife is part of a Spanish region called Canary Islands (at the moment it is still owned by Spain).

In the other hand, it's quite stupid that you said they speak really different there comparing to Mexico, I'm from north Spain and in my opinion the Canary Islands is the only region in Spain where they speak similar to Latin-americans.

Just to end, I wanna say that inside Spain there are different kinds of accents, people from Oviedo (Asturias) do not speak like people from Sevilla (Andalucía), etc. It depends the region inside Spain. It's like comparing the English from Glasgow (Scotland) and the English from Bourthmouth (England), it's not the same!!!

It is said the standar Spanish from Spain is the one they speak in Valladolid (Castille). So I think if you wanna compare Mexico and Spain Spanish it will be good and easier to start comparing the standars of both countries (otherwise it's going to be really complicated, every region here has got a totally different accent!!!)

Bye bye.
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Thanks for your comment dear anonymous user but it would be nicer from you if u will never use again the word STUPIP to define other opinions different from yours.

Thanks.
Anonymous
It is said the standar Spanish from Spain is the one they speak in Valladolid (Castille).

I have heard Burgos and Salamanca mentioned, as well as Madrid - probably depends on whther you come form Valladolid, Burgos, Salamanca or Madrid.Emotion: smile

your not the only one i am a 9th grader and i am looking for answers too so just look duh!!!
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To the Spaniard who said that people group with Latin American, not everybody believes that. (Soy estadounidense y claro que sé donde está tu país.) And to the other anonymous person who commented on Little Cloud's post as stupid, get over yourself. Get off your pedestal because you are nobody special to be insulting another person.

In Standard Spanish from , z, ce, and ci, are pronounced with the sound th (like the initial sound of "think" as somebody has mentioned before.) So, "gracias" would be pronounced as "grathias". However, in , everything previously mentioned is pronounced like s. "Gracias" is "grasias".

Another difference is the use of "ustedes" y "vosotros". In Mexico, as well as all of Latin America (and the ? The Canary Islands is apart of , but their Spanish is more similar to that of Caribbean Spanish), "ustedes" is used to refer to more than one person. However, in they use both "ustedes" and "vosotros". Vosotros is used with people whom you talk to with "tu"; the same goes for ustedes. I hope that isn't confusing?

Also, j, gi, and ge are pronounced a lot harder in . (They all make the English h sound, if you don't remember)

If I made a mistake, somebody feel free to correct me!
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