+0
Does this word "Frenches" exist?

What is the different between Frenchmen and the French?

One French/Frenhman lives in my home<<<Does this sentence correct?

Thank you
1 2
Comments  (Page 2) 
We often would use "a French person" eg. "there is a French person living in my house", because this is neutral (not male or female), ore more colloquially - " A French guy" or "a French girl" - "
She's a french girl"

"Frenchman, Frenchwoman" etc are seen to be old-fashioned, and in some cases almost racist (eg "Chinaman"), so should be avoided.

More frequently, we would be specific about the role of the person in question, depending on the context, eg "There is a French student living in my house", or "I'm going out with a French journalist" etc etc
CAMPBELLWe often would use "a French person" eg. "there is a French person living in my house", because this is neutral (not male or female), ore more colloquially - " A French guy" or "a French girl" -
Just a question: in these case, I think that the word "french" is an adjective. aren't we talking about the noun "french"?

Thanks
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
it really clear, thx a lot:)
pieanneAnd no, "Frenches" doesn't exist.

Yes, it does exist, but only as the plural form of the surname "French" (which happens to be my surname). For example, you would refer individually to Mr. French or Mrs. French, but if you refer to them as a couple or as a family, you would say "the Frenches."