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Today, I vistied the website asking that title question.

Original question is following :

which do you prefer going to the mountains or going to the beach?

which do you prefer going to mountains or going to the beach?

which do you prefer going to a mountain or going to the beach?

I am just curious about what is different between "a beach and a mountain" and "the beach and the mountain". I heard that people say "going to the mountain, going to the beach" a lot. Also I read a bunch of writing about hobbies on Cragislist.org. there are a lot of "going to the beach" rather than "going to a beach".

I think there is no big difference but to non-native speaker, it's kind of important thing. Distingush why people use another form in a writing and a conversation could be a key to solve thousands of questions to them.

thank you in advance!!

have a super great day. here is really hot and dead boring!
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Hi Ghkgrk,

Welcome to the Forum.

'Going to the beach' is really just a standard, idiomatic way of speaking. We say it that way just because we like to say it that way. It's a general way of speaking. We are not usually thinking of one beach or of a specific beach.

'Going to a beach'. When we say this, we are thinking a bit more specifically. Somewhere, there is a beach and we'd like to go to it.

You might want to compare the rather similar 'going to school' and 'going to a school', or 'going to the movies' and 'going to a movie'.

Do you have any more questions about this?

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank you, Clive.

I do not have any questions about that.. and what your answer is what I thought, there are a bunch of people around the world who teach that there is an absolutely rule in English.

What I thought is that there is no absolutely rule in any languages and the proof which must come from an american.

Because a lot of people want to know american' english rather than England' english.

I may use your answer to the person who asked that question on the website I visited.

May I ?
Hi again,

What I thought is that there is no absolutely rule in any languages and the proof which must come from an american. I'm not an American, I'm Canadian.

I may use your answer to the person who asked that question on the website I visited.

May I ? Do whatever you wish with it. Thanks for asking.



I'd like to add one more comment about 'Going to the beach'. As well as being a general way of speaking, it can be used in a very specific sense. eg

A: Tomorrow, are you going to stay in the park at Jones Avenue all day?

B: No, we're going to the beach. It's just 100 metres east of the park. Why don't you try to meet us there?

However, I think you'll usually hear the expression used in the very general sense.

Best wishes, Clive