I hear people a lot of time saying B.A. with honors. What is the difference between simple B.A. and B.A. with honors?

And please can you define Cambridge tripos in simple terms?
Hi,

I hear people a lot of time saying B.A. with honors. What is the difference between simple B.A. and B.A. with honors?

An honours degree involves more intencsive studying, often or even always over a longer period of time. Details can vary from one university to another. The University of Toronto, for example, no longer offers non-honours dgrees. For some details, check their site,

http://www.artsandscience.utoronto.ca/ofr/calendar/degree.htm


And please can you define Cambridge tripos in simple terms? Have a look here - http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/tripos.html

Best wishes, Clive
In the UK you'll often find non-honours degrees are 3 years and honours degrees are 4 years. Honours degrees also involve studying at a higher (harder?) level.
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Or an honours degree has more than one major. My first degree was an honours course over three years, but had two majors.
Or an honours degree has more than one major. My first degree was an honours course over three years, but had two majors.
Hi LRR,

Please explain those red parts.
Has anyone noticed that the practical differences between the two degrees have not been mentioned at all? The only answer we seem to have generated is that one (honours) takes longer and is more difficult.
The impression my own University counselling staff gives me is that, unless you're headed for a Masters, the differences are minimal, practically speaking. Your employability is not significantly different with or without honours, especially if your degree won't yield corporate interest.
Would that I could claim my degree is valuable in itself but post-secondary education is an efficiency-based system that I have found more emotionally and financially taxing than it is constructive.
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