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Hi Everyone.

I need a verb that goes with the noun "circle" in its abstract sense and expresses the fact that - to translate it literally from Polish - the circle closes.

For example, in Polish we've got two ways of saying that something is a viscious circle: either by simply calling it a viscious circle, or explaining the phenomenon (e.g. TV gives us crap, we get used to it and want more, so they give it to us) and finishing off with a comment: "and the circle closes". I don't think this phrase is natural in English - could anyone suggest anything more suitable?
Take care
Marta
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Comments  
In AE at any rate, we call it a vicious cycle, not circle, and when speaking of it we focus on the process of creation rather than the cycle itself.

You eat a candy bar and the sugar gives you a burst of energy, but an hour later you experience an energy slump, which makes you want another candy bar - this creates a vicious cycle of sugar highs and lows. (Or, "this sets up a vicious cycle.")
First, we do call it a vicious cirlcle. Actually, I would say that vicious circle is far more common than vicious cycle.

Second, I love 'the circle closes'. It has a poetic charm and is perfectly understandable.

e.g. TV gives us crap, we get used to it and want more, so they give it to us and the circle closes.

I'd say go with it...I think that I may start using it!
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Thank you, Delmobile.

Cwtch, thanks a lot, though I didn't mean to introduce any amendments to English language Emotion: wink But if You say the phrase is fine, I'll give You my precious maxim: If you buy milk, you have to buy cereal - and the circle closes. (That's actually what I was looking the verb for.)

Marta
You may get all backed up! Emotion: surprise
I'm sorry - of course we do call it a vicious circle too. I don't know what I was thinking.
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materinaduszkaCwtch, thanks a lot, though I didn't mean to introduce any amendments to English language Emotion: wink

No, it's great. That's how languages grow. English is dynamic because it readily adopts words and phrases from other languages.
materinaduszkaTV gives us crap, we get used to it and want more, so they give it to us) and finishing off with a comment:
And we're right back where we started from.

This is the English equivalent that comes to mind first for me when talking about a vicious circle.

Nevertheless, there is also an expression in English that comes closer to being a literal translation:

And we've come full circle.

CJ
Okay, you guys need to go read "If You Give a Moose a Muffin" now!
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