A verb "to aim" and a suffix "-er" makes the noun "an aimer", right?
I can understand that it means "someone who aims, directs, or points at something".
But the suffix "-er" is used for an object, such as "lighter", "binder" etc., as well, isn't it?
So, can "an aimer" also mean "something that helps you focus on, aim or point at something", like a sighting device you use when you shoot a gun or play archery?
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Parochial OrphanA verb "to aim" and a suffix "-er" makes the noun "an aimer", right?
I can understand that it means "someone who aims, directs, or points at something".
But the suffix "-er" is used for an object, such as "lighter", "binder" etc., as well, isn't it?
So, can "an aimer" also mean "something that helps you focus on, aim or point at something", like a sighting device you use when you shoot a gun or play archery?
I've never heard it used that way, but your logic is good. Check with your favorite English/English dictionary.
Actually, I did check with some English/English dictionaries, both paper based and on-line,
and I found one on Dictionary.com , but it only shows it as "derivatives" within the article of the verb "to aim".
So I've further researched it, and found "one who aims, directs..." on Answers.com , which, I think, shows in a form of quotation from the old Webster online.

I first saw the word "aimer" in a bit of short reading. It was something about ancient hunting.
It says that people in hunting period had different characteristics. They had different bodies because they had different roles.
"They became chasers, aimers, and prey-killers." or something to that effect.
The meaning used here is obvious.
Then a friend of mine asked me if the word could reffer to an object, and I couldn't answer to it.

Anyway, Philip, you've never heard it used in this way. That surely helps me a lot. Thanks.
It's just a sticky, twisted spirit of mine, after all.
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hello..i am not a native speaker of english..and honestly, i am very weak in English..however, according to the "concise Oxford Dictionary-Tenth Edition", there are "aim, aimless, aimlessly,aimlessness".. but there is no "aimer".. (",)
Yeah, well, it can happen sometimes. I have "Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English" and "Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary" but there's no entry either. If you google it (you won't find this in a dictionary.), you'll get a lot of results of some French verb, and only a few of "an aimer". Maybe the Dictionaries right. Maybe there's no such word as "an aimer", not legitimate at least, I guess.
It actually does exist. It's mostly for telescopes, to point out a specific location in the sky.

Example from Google:
"Hotech Corporation has hit the nail on the head with their introduction of the Astro Aimer Generation II Green Laser Device. Green laser pointer/aimers have ..."
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This is great! Thank you!
If I were having a casual conversation with someone and mentioned an aimer, I probably wouldn't be understood. At best, it would take the person a little time to figure out what I meant. On the other hand, I think aim, aimed, aimless, and aimlessly would be understood immediately.
I guess you're right. It's not a familiar word to me either.

Sorry I left it for so long, and thanks for you comment.
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