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What does 'as' and 'while' mean in this? Is it the right word to use?

His team is down by 10 AS he doesn't shoot the ball well.

His team is down by 10 AS he scores 15 points.

While = although or despite the fact but when I subsitute, it doesn't read correctly.

WHILE he's had the support of his team mates, his opponent hasn't which is why they are losing.

Although he's had the support of his team mates, his opponent hasn't which is why they are losing.

Despite the fact he's had the support of his team mates, his opponent hasn't which is why they are losing.

Thanks
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In most cases, you would clear up the confusion by changing the word to a more exact one.

AS
His team is down by 10 AS he doesn't shoot the ball well.
Here "as" means "because." (a reason indicator)
His team is down by 10 because he doesn't shoot the ball well.

His team is down by 10 AS he scores 15 points.
Here, I think, "as" is being used to indicate a time. But the sentence is not clearly written. I would say:
His team is down by 10 when he scores 15 points.

WHILE
WHILE he's had the support of his teammates, his opponent hasn't which is why they are losing.
This sentence is fine (while=although). The problem may be the sentence structure.
While he's had the support of his teammates, his opponent hasn't--which is why they are losing.
OR: While he's had the support of his teammates, his opponent hasn't. That is why they are losing.

Does this help?
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Can the as mean while? Commentators use it to mean while I think.

When using while, you usually talk about the same person in both clauses, here you are talking about 2 different people.

Here you are talking about the same person in both clauses.
While I fully understand your point of view, I do also have some sympathy with Michael's.

So replacing while with although sounds fine.

Although I fully understand your point of view, I do also have some sympathy with Michael's.

In the sentence

You are talking about 2 opponents, is that why it sounds weird?

While he's had the support of his teammates, his opponent hasn't--which is why they are losing.

Now if I were to talk about the same person

This sounds better because it is about the same guy. What do you think about using while and although when talking about 2 different people

While [although] he's had the support of his teammates, he hasn't played very well.

Thank you for the helpr
Some comments on your remarks:
Can the as mean while? Commentators use it to mean while I think.
Yes, you can use "as" to mean "while" (a time).

When using while, you usually talk about the same person in both clauses, here you are talking about 2 different people.
I'm not sure what you are saying here. It doesn't have to be the same person; it can be a comparison of two people: While I like George, Mark is my real favorite.

Here you are talking about the same person in both clauses.
While I fully understand your point of view, I do also have some sympathy with Michael's.
The question of whether it is one person or two different people who are the focus of the sentence depends on how the sentence is worded. You can also word this sentence as: "While I fully understand your point of view, Michael's point of view is more sympathetic."

So replacing while with although sounds fine.
Usually, but not always.

Although I fully understand your point of view, I do also have some sympathy with Michael's.

In the sentence

You are talking about 2 opponents, is that why it sounds weird? No, it makes perfect sense as written.
While he's had the support of his teammates, his opponent hasn't--which is why they are losing.

Now if I were to talk about the same person

This sounds better because it is about the same guy. What do you think about using while and although when talking about 2 different people

While [although] he's had the support of his teammates, he hasn't played very well.
This also works. However, the question is: has "while" been used as a substitute for "although" or as a substitute for "during the time when." It can be used either way.