1 2 3 4 5 6
I still can't see it. The "mwa" spelling seems as unlikely as the "bwa" one. Still, I've never heard a dog say "woof" or "bow-wow" either.

Little Orphan Annie's dog Sandy used to say "arf" (no relation to me) whereas in Pogo, some dogs used to say "Ralph".
S&
Little Orphan Annie's dog Sandy used to say "arf" (no relation to me) whereas in Pogo, some dogs used to say "Ralph".

On the other hand, Finnish comic strip dogs say "how, how" which may indicate a curiousity more characteristic of cats.

S&
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
On 06 Jan 2004, Joe Fineman wrote

Every once in a while, somebody responds to a newsgroup ... world, are such strings intended to suggest? Sputtering? Vomiting? Crying?

I've always taken it to be "Diabolical and Maniacal Laugh by Evil Master with Nefarious Plan" probably accompanied by the twirl of a metaphorical moustache.

It fits. I'm growing a moustache. My wife says BWA-HAHAHAHAHA! - just the maniacal laughter bit - every time she sees it.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
sand filted:
Little Orphan Annie's dog Sandy used to say "arf" (no relation to me) whereas in Pogo, some dogs used to say "Ralph".

On the other hand, Finnish comic strip dogs say "how, how" which may indicate a curiousity more characteristic of cats.

To my eventual regret, I once taught a dog how to bark...a first pass at transcription would be /ro:/, but I'd need Evan's advanced course to properly identify the non-cardinal vowel I actually used...the key to sounding properly doglike lies in approximating the shape of the canine vocal apparatus, which is much more elongated than that of the human...the sound-effects person on "An American Werewolf In London" seemed to realize this; David Naughton's cries of pain during his transformation changed timbre as his snout elongated..r
On 06 Jan 2004, Joe Fineman wrote I've always taken ... probably accompanied by the twirl of a metaphorical moustache.

It fits. I'm growing a moustache. My wife says BWA-HAHAHAHAHA! - just the maniacal laughter bit - every time she sees it.

Lose the moustache, dear boy, lose it! Too gay these days.

Mike.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I always envision a mad-scientist type, rubbing his hands together as he contemplates his plan to annihilate the Earth.
It fits. I'm growing a moustache. My wife says BWA-HAHAHAHAHA! - just the maniacal laughter bit - every time she sees it.

Lose the moustache, dear boy, lose it! Too gay these days.

Better yet, grow a beard to keep it company and throw away your razor.

Ray Heindl
(remove the Xs to reply)
Every once in a while, somebody responds to a newsgroup posting with a mixture of labial consonants & open vowels, ... well as b's & w's.) What sound, in the nonverbal world, are such strings intended to suggest? Sputtering? Vomiting? Crying?

It's a guffaw - the BWA is the slight attempt to suppress laughter from bursting out, and the hahaha is the irrepressible laughter bursting forth. Generally it's a type of ridicule. The is also the variation MUHAHAHAHA which is the mock-villainous laughter of the cartoon villain, with the implied meaning "ain't I evil?"
Mingmong
Little Orphan Annie's dog Sandy used to say "arf" (no relation to me) whereas in Pogo, some dogs used to say "Ralph".

On the other hand, Finnish comic strip dogs say "how, how" which may indicate a curiousity more characteristic of cats.

I think the sound French dogs make (oua, oua or ouah, ouah) is more doggy.
Rob Bannister
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
(all text snipped)
Never thought I'd be replying to a nom de net, but what the hey ...

Spangle by Gary Jennings is available from most large sellers of used books on the Net. Half.com offers several hardback copies in the .00 range (plus S&H, of course). The complete text is in that single hardback volume. The book was not released in paperback until several years after initial publication, and then in a series of three mass-market volumes. So you need to buy three different paperbacks to get the complete text.
Or were you asking about something else?

Bob Lieblich
Always trying to help
Show more