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Children spend too much time on schoolwork, to the detriment of other activities.

It seems like "to the detriment of other activities" modifies its entire preceding clause "Children...on schoolwork".

Am I right?

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fire1It seems like "to the detriment of other activities" modifies its entire preceding clause "Children...on schoolwork".

Yes, though 'modify' is not the right word to describe the relationship.

There's probably a technical term for that relationship, but I don't know it. That final prepositional phrase is almost a second predicate.

..., and that is to the detriment of other activities.

CJ

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Children spend too much time on schoolwork, to the detriment of other activities.

I'm inclined to say that the underlined element is a verbless clause functioning as an adjunct to the preceding clause.

It is semantically similar to the supplementary relative clause "which is to the detriment of other activities".

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Comments  
CalifJim
fire1It seems like "to the detriment of other activities" modifies its entire preceding clause "Children...on schoolwork".

Yes, though 'modify' is not the right word to describe the relationship.

There's probably a technical term for that relationship, but I don't know it. That final prepositional phrase is almost a second predicate.

..., and that is to the detriment of other activities.

CJ

Jane, to her credit, helped the woman withoutknowing the situation.

Then, like "to the detriment", can "to her credit" in the sentence above be seen as releted to its entire previois clause "Jane helped...situation"?

fire1Jane, to her credit, helped the woman withoutknowing the situation.Then, like "to the detriment", can "to her credit" in the sentence above be seen as releted to its entire previois clause "Jane helped...situation"?

Yes, but in this case it's the surrounding clause, not the previous clause.

Not knowing the technical term, I'd call these sorts of phrases sentential commentaries, i.e., comments about the contents of the entire sentence.

CJ

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 BillJ's reply was promoted to an answer.