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It is a very common phrase in the UK indeed. I believe it comes from football. When the ball goes in the supporter says 'get in' as a way of expressing delight and relieving of frustration at gaining the upper hand (which could be seen as good luck). This has extended to other areas, when your horse comes in, when you pass an exam etc. I believe personally it is used when you are the favourite or there is a low element of risk. For example if I won the lottery the chances are so unlikely 'get in' probably wouldn't be used, but could be by some.

What is a pom?

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anonymous

What is a pom?

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pom

It is a slang word.

I’m from Manchester and that’s how we use it too - a response to good news, celebration, and also of course for football success!

AlpheccaStars
anonymous

What is a pom?

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pom

It is a slang word.

A whinging pom! Hah! That's a new one on me.

The things you don't learn at englishforums!

Thanks for that.

CJ

I once heard a young woman in London express extreme surprise by saying "Shut the fridge!" Is that American as well? Seems like it might be because I know we have "Shut the front door!"

CJ

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