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What does "He left in ten minutes" mean?
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He left in ten minutes -- Doesn't make sense.

He left ten minutes ago -- He already left.

He will leave in ten minutes -- He is getting ready to leave now.
AnonymousWhat does "He left in ten minutes" mean?
He arrived, and before ten minutes had passed, he left.
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DanyooHe left in ten minutes -- Doesn't make sense.

He left ten minutes ago -- He already left.

He will leave in ten minutes -- He is getting ready to leave now.

See Philip's post here.
Philip
AnonymousWhat does "He left in ten minutes" mean?
He arrived, and before ten minutes had passed, he left.
This expression still sounds strange to me. I would usually say:

-He stayed for ten minutes, or
-He stayed for less than ten minutes.
He left in ten minutes. - He did not stay even ten minutes. He left before 10 minutes had passed. OR He left just when 10 minutes had passed.

A friend of mine came to visit me today. He hinted that he was hungry. I suspect he wanted me to fix him something to eat. I said that I was busy and was going to skip dinner. He left in ten minutes.

CJ
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Danyoo
Philip
AnonymousWhat does "He left in ten minutes" mean?
He arrived, and before ten minutes had passed, he left.
This expression still sounds strange to me. I would usually say:

-He stayed for ten minutes, or
-He stayed for less than ten minutes.

So you wouldn't use "He left within ten minutes of arriving"?
Dear sir,

It is my opinion that we may say «He left within ten minutes of arriving».

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
"He left within ten minutes of arriving" -- this sounds perfectly fine to me. I would use it. But I wouldn't use "He left in ten minutes" by itself unless the meaning is very clear from the context as in the example provided by CJ above.
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