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What does phrase under his belt mean?
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From a dictionary:
"under one's belt"
= safely or satisfactorily achieved, experienced, or acquired, e.g. 'I want to get more experience under my belt'; 'He now has almost a year as president under his belt.'
= (of food or drink) consumed, e.g. 'Gus already had a large brandy under his belt.'
AnnvanFrom a dictionary: "under one's belt" = safely or satisfactorily achieved, experienced, or acquired, e.g. 'I want to get more experience under my belt'; 'He now has almost a year as president under his belt.' = (of food or drink) consumed, e.g. 'Gus already had a large brandy under his belt.'

Under the belt =is an expression referring to experience, skill or training one acquired.

He had 2 years as a science teacher under his belt.

It’s important to have some practical sales experience under your belt before taking on the manager position.

BTW- the explanation on the highlighted sentences are not really exactly what it means

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Sorry, maybe my layout was confusing. "Under the belt" can have 2 meanings: (1) safely or satisfactorily achieved, experienced or acquired, or (2) - when referring to food or drink - consumed.
Jackson6612What does phrase under his belt mean?
Is under his belt an idiomatic phrase? In my opinion it is. But couldn't we simply call it an idiom?
Yes - it's an idiom. I'm not sure what your question is here?
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As far as I'm concerned, I remember , in the European history, some of the Europeans.. what we call "Bourgeois" had been walking around the malls holding their gold and/or silver coins under the belt... From this context, "under the belt " had meant to be "in the possession."
AnonymousAs far as I'm concerned, I remember, in the European history, some of the Europeans.. what we call "Bourgeois" had been walking around the malls holding their gold and/or silver coins under the belt... From this context, "under the belt" had meant to be "in the possession."
1: May I, please, know who are we?

2: I would say ''what we call Bourgeois used to walk around...''. Which way is better?

3: Did they have some kind of pockets under their belts? Otherwise, how would a belt hold coins under it?

4: I would say ''From this context, 'under the belt' would meant 'in the possession'''.

5: Is the punctuation, three quotation marks, at the end of the above sentence correct?
Sorry I see your old post, but this may help others. Put simply it means something which a person has mastered or achieved. For example I have several computer skills under my belt, means I have achieved competency with those skills.

Another example a football team may have 5 wins under their belt. Which means they've achieved those 5 wins.
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