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German Chancellor Angela Merkel recently caused protests with the call for a five-day lockdown over the Easter holiday to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

She reacted to the opposition by apologizing to members of the German parliament: "The mistake is my mistake alone. I ask both the public and you… for forgiveness. "



I'm not sure if the prepositional phrase modifies the noun 'protests' or the verb 'caused'.

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anonymousI'm not sure if the prepositional phrase modifies the noun 'protests' or the verb 'caused'.

'caused'. The prepositional phrase is an adjunct, which is a type of modifier according to some textbooks. In other words, it's adverbial. It tells us how Merkel caused the protests.

CJ

Comments  
anonymousGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel recently caused protests with the call for a five-day lockdown over the Easter holiday to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

In my opinion, the PP "with the call for a five-day lockdown over the Easter holiday to slow the spread of the coronavirus" is not the modifier in the quoted sentence. It is the complement of the verb "caused".

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anonymousthe PP "with the call for a five-day lockdown over the Easter holiday to slow the spread of the coronavirus" is not the modifier in the quoted sentence. It is the complement of the verb "caused"

It is the complement. There is a strong syntactical association of the complement of the preposition "with", i.e., the call for a... with the verb "caused": German Chancellor Angela Merkel's call caused protests.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.