+0
Although the benefit of the critical care unit is related to the availability of these physiologic data, practitioners must exercise clinical judgment and avoid the temptation to collect data for their own sake.

My question is "their" refers to what in the sentence.

(I think it refers to "data", but could it be also interpreted as referring to "practitioners"?)
1 2
Comments  
MapleAlthough the benefit of the critical care unit is related to the availability of these physiologic data, practitioners must exercise clinical judgment and avoid the temptation to collect data for their own sake.

My question is "their" refers to what in the sentence.

(I think it refers to "data", but could it be also interpreted as referring to "practitioners"?)
'Their' refers to 'practitioners'. Otherwise, it would be 'data for the sake of collecting' or something like that.
I just thought "to collect data for their own sake" equals "to collect data for data themselves (or itself-I'm not sure), but not for the benefit of the patients; i.e. for clinical purpose".

Maybe the context will give more clues:

Although the contributions of cell and molecular biology to critical care medicine are substantial, the critical care unit resembles somewhat a physiology laboratory, wherein variables such as heart rate and blood pressure are measured in an online fashion, and the effects of interventions such as vasoactive drugs can be directly observed. Although the benefit of the critical care unit is related to the availability of these physiologic data, practitioners must exercise clinical judgment and avoid the temptation to collect data for their own sake.

Thanks for your comments!
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I've just read this thread again. It seems that it will give the reader an impression that I know the answer. But it's not true. The fact is I still don't know what their exactly refers to. I only have an inclination that it should refer to data. Sorry for my unskilled expression.
MapleI've just read this thread again. It seems that it will give the reader an impression that I know the answer. But it's not true. The fact is I still don't know what their exactly refers to. I only have an inclination that it should refer to data. Sorry for my unskilled expression.
practitioners must (exercise clinical judgment and) avoid the temptation to collect data for their own sake.

their = practitioner
Vary rarely would a doctor collect data for making himself pleasure.
He/she does for for a purpose, e.g. a research project, etc.

When the purpose is undefined/unclear, the data are collected meaninglessly or in an exagerated fashion (including bothering patients in critical condition).

Their
refers to data
, IMO. One could BTW invoke the proximity between data and their for drawing the same conclusion.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
no
I'd agree with Maple.

It is confusing because both practitioners and data are plural.

If theirs were referred to practitioners, in this example: "I study for its own sake", we should have "I study for my own sake", shouldn't we?

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=56799&dict=CALD

for its own sake
If you do something for its own sake, you do it because it is interesting and enjoyable, and not because you have or need to do it:
I study for its own sake.


May I ask another question? Could the following be possible?

Although the benefit of the critical care unit is related to the availability of these physiologic data, practitioners must exercise clinical judgment and avoid the temptation to collect data for itsown sake.

(its= the action of collectiong data?)
the practitioners must avoid temptation to collect data for their own advantage

the benefit of this contraption is related to the availibility of the data.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more