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What does this sentence exactly mean?:

"The car accelerated to overtake me."

Does it mean "The car sped up and overtook me finally"? or "The car was trying hard in order to pass me but not overtook me yet"? or Both is possible depending on the situation?

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The car increased its speed and the intention was to overtake "me". Nothing further is said.

CB

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thanks3Does it mean "The car sped up and overtook me finally"? or "The car was trying hard in order to pass me but not overtook me yet"?

I've seen this construction used for both meanings. Only the context can resolve it.

I'd start with the thought that the car did not yet overtake me, but I'd be willing to accept the other meaning if subsequent events confirmed it.

CJ

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thanks3What does this sentence exactly mean?:

The car accelerated with the intention of overtaking you. If it did overtake you, it would have to be something like "The car accelerated and overtook me."

 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thank you Mr. anonymous, you gave me confirmation.

By the way, did you happen to see my comment on my last question:

So, Isn't there any chance that "allow for something" means "enable something"?

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
thanks3So, Isn't there any chance that "allow for something" means "enable something"?

No.