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What does the sentence ''that'll do'' mean?

Context:

I want you all to meet the son of Priest Vallon.

I took him under my wing...

...and see how I'm repaid.

He saved my life one day so he could kill me the next...

...like a sneak thief.

Instead of fighting like a man.

A base defiler. Unworthy of a noble name.

That'll do, Mcgloin. Spread him out.

I hate blackies. You..you get to watch.

This is fresh meat!

We need to tenderise this meat a bit.

Alright, lets kiss goodnight to that pretty face of yours!
Comments  
The expression "That'll do" usually means "That is sufficient/adequate/satisfactory."
Hi Amy,

Is that really a sentence?
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Hi Jackson

Yes, it's a sentence. It's an idiomatic usage of the verb 'do'. Another way to reword "That'll do" would be this:
That will suffice.
Thank you, Amy.

Kind regards, Jackson
It means "that will do". The clue is in the apostrophe. Where ' is used to replace part of a word to abbreviate it. e.g. didn't = did not, couldn't = could not, I've = I have, and so on. Usually only seen written in context where a person is speaking as this has derived from interpreting dialect or speech into a written format.
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AnonymousUsually only seen written in context where a person is speaking as this has derived from interpreting dialect or speech into a written format.
What does "this" refer to?

Shouldn't it be "has been derived"?

I don't understand the overall meaning of the sentence, so please help me.

Thanks.
Jackson6612 AnonymousUsually only seen written in context where a person is speaking as this has derived from interpreting dialect or speech into a written format.What does "this" refer to?Shouldn't it be "has been derived"?I don't understand the overall meaning of the sentence, so please help me.Thanks.
I believe his use of 'this' refers to the idiomatic phrase in question - that'll do. And he is saying that such idiomatic phrases come from interpreting spoken language into written form.

I have used that phrase many times, it is common where I come from, the western USA, outside the big cities. So, for example, I am talking to someone about a task that was completed and they ask if it is completed satisfactorily (not using those exact words of course). And I might reply "yep, that'll do" (yes, that will do) simply meaning he did a good good, an acceptable job.

Hope that helps,
Chip
What ever it is that magloin was doing was sufficient, discontiinue it.
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