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In a comedy by congreve named The Double Dealer there is this sentence;Should she smoak my design upon Cynthia , I were in a fine pickle.
What does smoak mean here  ?
Is my interpretation of fine pickle right?Which I think means "I were angry with her or sth like this".
Thanks for your answers 
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I believe that "smoak" here is an old spelling of "smoke", used in the obsolete(?) sense of "suspect".

"a fine pickle" is an awkward or difficult situation.

So, my interpretation of the whole thing is: "I'd be in trouble if she suspected my design upon Cynthia".
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Amendment

In this play a man who says this sentence to himself dissembles having passion towards a woman but in secret he loves Cynthia ; therefore, he says this:

" Should she smoak my design upon Cynthia ,I were in a fine pickle . She has a damn'd penetrating head , and knows how to interpret a coldness the right way;therefore I must dissemble ardour and ecstasy ,that's resolved."

I myself think smoak  here means to realize or to discover because this meaning can be interpreted through the subsequent lines and the subject of play.
Mr Wordy
Avangi
Edit.  To have a design upon someone is to have a possibly evil plan for that person.

It's also possible it could mean to have romantic intentions towards them. I guess you'd need to read through the context to know exactly what sort of "designs" these were.
As Mr Wordy said in this play "design upon Cynthia" means a romantic intention towards Cynthia.

Thanks Mr wordy And Avangi for your answers 
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coloradayI myself think smoak here means to realize or to discover because this meaning can be interpreted through the subsequent lines and the subject of play

Right, in Collins Dictionary it says, for "smoke", "Archaic. to suspect or detect", so I guess the exact meaning on this spectrum is whichever fits the context best.
coloradayWhich construction does th conditional sentence conform?
"I were" is an archaic form of wording here (a subjunctive, I think!). Nowadays you'd say "I would be". Starting a conditional sentence with "Should she... " (rather than "If she...") also now has a literary or, to some people, old-fashioned feel.
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Comments  
To be in a fine pickle is to be in an awkward situation - a bad mess. You find yourself in a difficult position which you may have serious trouble getting out of.

Sorry, I can't find "smoak" anywhere, except as a person's name.

From your sentence, it seems like "reveal" might work.

If she reveals what I plan to do to Cynthia, I'll be in big trouble.
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Edit. To have a design upon someone is to have a possibly evil plan for that person.
Avangi
Edit. To have a design upon someone is to have a possibly evil plan for that person.
It's also possible it could mean to have romantic intentions towards them. I guess you'd need to read through the context to know exactly what sort of "designs" these were.

(The 'duplicate post' link was circular or Moebian, so I have edited it out-- MM)
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Mr Wordy old spelling of "smoke", used in the obsolete(?) sense of "suspect".
Hi Mr. Wordy. Thanks for the tip on the duplicate post.
I wonder if we have a pondial situation here. I was guessing in the other thread, but your view sent me to the dictionary. My Am. Htg. says your usage is not obsolete, but gives "expose to public view; reveal" rather than "suspect." Pehaps it's a British usage. My unabridged subscription has lapsed.
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AvangiI was guessing in the other thread, but your view sent me to the dictionary. My Am. Htg. says your usage is not obsolete, but gives "expose to public view; reveal" rather than "suspect." Pehaps it's a British usage. My unabridged subscription has lapsed

Hi Avangi

Right. "Expose to public view, reveal" seems equally plausible in the passage quoted, though I'd have thought different enough from "suspect" not to be conflated in a dictionary definition. However, the version of Am. Htg. I'm looking at (http://www.bartleby.com/61/85/S0498500.html ) gives this meaning for "smoke out", but not for "smoke" by itself. I'm familiar with the "smoke out" meaning, but I didn't know "smoke" by itself could be used in this sense. Does the version you're looking at definitely say it can?
Hi Wordy, Yes, it does. (Sorry for the harangue, or however it's spelled.) This is the second time in two days I've accidently posted in the wrong thread, and I'm starting to come apart.

I'll post an exact quote from Am. Htg. God knows where I'll end up putting it! Emotion: phew
Damn, this is terrible Emotion: angry You're right. I had read the "smoke out" listing and dismissed it. Then I proceeded to slip a cog. I need to install a tilt switch in my brain. I was quite sure I had it right. I think I'd better hang it up for a few days.

Many thanks for your indulgence.
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