Q1: What does the speak say between 5:50 and 5:53? "argacocoal regime"?

Q2: Between 8:48 and 9:07 the speaker says: As much of a threat as Iran with nuclear weapons could conceivably pose to Israel sometime in the near future, as you and I sit here having this conversation, Israel has 200 nuclear weapons, most of them pointed at Tehran. Why wouldn't Iran want nuclear weapons?

I couldn't understand the structure of the sentence above, though I understand its literal meaning. Mostly 'as much of (something) as' is preceded by a noun phrase or 'is', 'are', etc. Check this link for the use of 'as much of a threat as':
http://www.google.com/search?q=%22As+much+of+a+threat+as%22&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t

But here the sentence begins with it. It would have been okay to me if it were something like this:
As you and I sit here having this conversation, Israel has 200 nuclear weapons, most of them pointed at Tehran which is as much of a threat as Iran with nuclear weapons could conceivably pose to Israel sometime in the near future. Why wouldn't Iran want nuclear weapons?

UQeGIBEuLEg
Oligarchical regime.
From Merriam Webster: of, relating to, or based on an oligarchy.

I think the structure "as (...) as someone is/might be/etc." has the same purpose of adverbs like "although", "even though", etc.
Source: Longman Dictionary. Take a look at this ( http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/as_2 ), meaning number 6 (= though)
So I think the meaning is: even though Iran with nuclear weapons can be a treat, they seem to have reason to want those weapons, since Isreal has a lot of them.
Thanks a lot, Kooyeen.

Q1: I'm sorry, but it doesn't seem linked Longman definition 6 fit in the context above. What do you say? Perhaps, it's just me.

Q2: I found this example sentence under the liked Longman definition, 'Try as she might, Sue couldn't get the door open'. Wouldn't it something like, 'Try though she might, Sue couldn't get the door open'?

Please help me with the queries above.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Jackson6612Q1: I'm sorry, but it doesn't seem linked Longman definition 6 fit in the context above. What do you say? Perhaps, it's just me.
I think the structure is the one used in the third example, meaning #6:
As popular as he is, the President hasn't always managed to have his own way.

As + adjective/description + as + rest of the sentence with the subject and the verb = As + much of a threat + as + Iran with nuclear weapons could conceivably pose...

Jackson6612Q2: I found this example sentence under the liked Longman definition, 'Try as she might, Sue couldn't get the door open'. Wouldn't it something like, 'Try though she might, Sue couldn't get the door open'?

I don't know. Remember I'm not a native speaker. Emotion: smile I have the feeling that "try as somebody might" might be a fixed expression though. But I'm not sure. Wait for someone else to reply, or start a new specific topic.