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What does God need with a starship?

Context: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0098382/quotes

Is the quote correct, grammatically? I would have written it: What does God need a starship for? "need with" collocation is not familoar with me. Perhaps, you could help me.
Comments  
The collocation is actually quite common. I'd venture to say it's as common as your suggested replacement.

Also, "What do you want with that?" vs. "What do you want that for?"

Both yours and mine are a bit rude, implying that your purpose is not legitimate - not justified.

Of course your original isn't rude, because presumably God has not asked for one.

When A suggests to B that C needs/wants something, the reply would not be rude.
Thanks a lot, Avangi.
AvangiOf course your original isn't rude, because presumably God has not asked for one.
It's a line from a movie. And God did ask for a starship - well, that was a fake God.

By the way, shouldn't it be a "God" with small 'g' because it's a false one?
AvangiWhen A suggests to B that C needs/wants something, the reply would not be rude.
Do you mean that when B would say, "What does C need/want with that 'something'", it wouldn't be considered rude?

Thanks once again for your guidance and time.
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You're correct on both assumptions.

Edit. On the other hand, if the others had not spotted him as an imposter, and sincerely believed they were addressing God, then they should address him as "God."
Thanks for the reply.

In the previous posting I said: It's a line from a movie. Though I had in my mind a particular movie, I still chose indefinite article instead of 'the'. Why is so? Obviously, I must be one who should know and be responsible for the choices made but in truth I don't see why I went for "a". So, help me, please.
Because if you had said, "It's a line from the movie," someone would have asked, "what movie?" You would only use "the" in this case if you had already been talking about the movie.
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Thanks, Khoff.