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What does "uhm" mean? Does it mean "yes" (impolitely)? And is it a common word?
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I could mean 'yes' ('uh-huh'), it could mean 'no' ('uh-uh'), it could mean 'I'm listening' ('uh-huh'), it could mean 'what?' ('huh?'), it could mean 'I'm pausing because I don't know what to say, but I want to keep speaking' ('umm').

All are common, and it is difficult to know which utterance you are talking about without any context.
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It most often is what we cause an "articulated pause" -- that is, the speaker stops for a second or two but keeps on making a sound, usually to indicate that he is not through speaking. I have a linguist friend who has made a study of the most common articulated pauses in various languages and has come up with some interesting differences.
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Comments  
I see the word "uhm" here . But it seems that the author is not serious. By the way, the spelling is un-English, isn't it?
Do not rely upon the Urban Dictionary for any definitions. 'Um' is not a word; it is merely the transcription of a sound, so there is no spelling rule.
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 Philip's reply was promoted to an answer.

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anonymous

Ya I don’t know what is uhm means but I’ll search it up at least???? I came back from searching it up I still don’t really get it!!!☹️☹️☹️☹️☹️☹️😣😣😢😢😢😢😢😢😢

It has no intrinsic meaning. It is a sound. It is spelled "um" ordinarily, and that's how you will find it in the dictionaries, but a writer can vary the spelling for effect because it is not a word, you might say. You will see "uhm", "ummmm" or whatever you like. It represents a sound people make unconsciously when they are trying to decide what to say next and want to signal that they aren't done talking yet. It is no different than "er", "uh" or "ah" in this use.

It can also be used deliberately in various ways. A great example of its deliberate use is in the movie Jurassic Park. The incomparable Samuel L. Jackson as Arnold says it after he flicks the switch that is supposed to turn the park system back on and nothing happens (1:33:21). That "um" is quite pregnant, but it defies definition, which is the whole idea.