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Please help me understand the following sentence:

"But he was fully aware that it(biography) was, to a significant degree, wrapped in the Judeo-Christian tradition, mixed up with classical elements and corrupted by the pressures of the 16th-century Reformation, of which 19th-century evangelicalism was one outcome."

What does "which" in the last clause refer to? Why? Please give me a explanation. Thank you.
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Hi,

Please help me to understand the following sentence:

"But he was fully aware that it(biography) was, to a significant degree, wrapped in the Judeo-Christian tradition, mixed up with classical elements and corrupted by the pressures of the 16th-century Reformation, of which 19th-century evangelicalism was one outcome."

What does "which" in the last clause refer to? Why? Please give me a explanation.

I'd say it's unclear. It seems pointless to me to debate such sentences purely in terms of grammar, because you never really know if the writer intended to follow such rules. It's better to consider what the writer is trying to say. If that does not make the meaning appear, then consider it an unclear sentence. It's the writer's problem, not yours. Emotion: wink

Best wishes, Clive
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Hi,

If there were no comma, 'which' would refer to Reformation.

But my basic point is this.

Are you sure that the writer thought carefully before placing a comma?

Are you sure that he thought carefully about his grammar?

I have my doubts, because I don't see it as a well-written sentence.

Clive
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Comments  
So the comma before the last clause makes no difference, does it?

Could you assume the writer followed the rule?

What the writer was intended to say is too complicated for me ,for I have no idea about evangelicalism.

Thank you.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Thank you for your enlightenment.Emotion: smile