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Subject and Predicate, Punctuations, Figurative Languages, Writing Poetry, Differences between there and they're are what they learn in English subject, but what about Tenses, using "as if", worthwhile, worth and those grammar topics in most ESL grammar books? Do they learn all of them?

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How long does extensive reading take effect? I started in my early teens and by the end of my teens I was able to write university essays and converse easily with educated people.

I mean the time it takes to be proficient in English from extensive reading. And what are grammar topics do they just need to learn? Topics that primary, secondary (KS1, KS2) students learn such as punctuation, Tenses, sentences, suffixes etc...? I don't remember the details of when and what grammar I was taught. All I remember was learning about parts of speech, tenses and sentence structure. My understanding is that KS1/2 students are usually 7 or 8. That seems very early to me, to teach such topics.


How do you know whether they know all grammar rules or not?I just know! Emotion: smile

Educated English speakers usually know whether a sentence is correct or incorrect, but often do not know why.


Here's a thought to ponder. The software that people use to communicate today typically comes with grammar-checking features. Will this have a positive or a negative impact on the future of English?

Clive

What type of book do you need to read to improve academic writing? College textbooks?

Here's a thought to ponder. The software that people use to communicate today typically comes with grammar-checking features. Will this have a positive or a negative impact on the future of English?

From my perspective, Grammar-checking is going to have a positive impact because it facilitates people in terms of grammar and writing. They don't have to rely on teachers to get their writing right. But that is not always the case. Since these grammar checking tools are based on AI, which could not be 100% accurate as teachers checking their pupil's writings.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

Mainly, just read good English. I've always read a lot of fiction.

To improve academic writing, you could read non-fiction and some books of essays. But, if your overall English improves, your academic English should also improve.

Finally, consider this. A lot of academic writing is not great English, eg long and convoluted sentences, too much passive voice, lack of clarity.

Clive

are self-help or self-improve books ok?

Any reading is good, but I think those books are not always well written.

Clive

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

What are good-written books then? Most Literature, Non-Fiction, Fiction? How about children books such as The Faraway Tree, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, The Midnight Gang? Are they well written?

Another question: Have you ever seen a word that can't be predicted from a context while reading and use a dictionary?

Just start by choosing books that interest you. I mean books that you enjoy reading.

If your English is poor, children's books are OK as a start.


Have you ever seen a word that can't be predicted from a context while reading and use a dictionary?

Yes, but not often. But when I was learning French, I did that a lot.

Clive