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Subject and Predicate, Punctuations, Figurative Languages, Writing Poetry, Differences between there and they're are what they learn in English subject, but what about Tenses, using "as if", worthwhile, worth and those grammar topics in most ESL grammar books? Do they learn all of them?

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mosja What English grammar topics do native speakers learn in school?

Most English sentence structure and vocabulary is learned as a baby learns how to speak.


When they first learn to write in school, pupils are taught punctuation and spelling. Distinguishing between homonyms (there / their / they're) is part of spelling.


They may learn formal grammar (sentence structure, diagramming) in middle school. In high school they may have classes in essay writing, creative writing and literature.

You can get a detailed understanding of English language instruction by reading the goals of the standardized tests per grade level. Here they are for Texas schools:

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter110/index.html

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It's not always taught in all parts of the world.

In Canada, I think schools teach no grammar, or a least very little.

In my opinion, there are lots of learners on this Forum who know much more grammar and much more grammar terminology than most native speakers. But that doesn't mean those learners speak better English!

Clive

there are lots of learners on this Forum who know much more grammar and much more grammar terminology than most native speakers

Isn't that make their writing skills better than natives?

But that doesn't mean those learners speak better English!

What make learners speaker better English? Extensive reading?

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Doesn't that make their writing skills better than natives?

That's not what i see in the writing that people post to this Forum.


What make learners speaker better English? Extensive reading?

Yes, that's a great idea.

It also helps a lot to grow up in an English-speaking country.

Clive

It also helps a lot to grow up in an English-speaking country.

What do you mean? m8.

I meant that native speakers benefit from being constantly in an English-speaking environment. Learners of English who immigrate to Canada often learn very quickly,

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How long does extensive reading take effect? I mean the time it takes to be proficient in English from extensive reading. And what are grammar topics do they just need to learn? Topics that primary, secondary (KS1, KS2) students learn such as punctuation, Tenses, sentences, suffixes etc...?

That's not what i see in the writing that people post to this Forum.

Some probably don't learn or know that much grammar. How do you know whether they know all grammar rules or not? If they do, doesn't that help them with reading/comprehending complex sentences? I agree with the fact that some learners know more SPaG structure, terms than natives and they can't even write decent English while some natives have no clue about grammar can speak fluently. Some learners for instance, get A on school English grammar exam but still writing garbled and incomprehensible English and worse yet, can't even speak English.

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