I mean the vehicles like Regio-Shuttle
(http://www.dot.state.co.us/NFRTAFS/korve/karl d~1/sld025.htm) or Alstom (). They are used as local buses but use track bars of the railway system.
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I mean the vehicles like Regio-Shuttle (http://www.dot.state.co.us/NFRTAFS/korve/karl d~1/sld025.htm) or Alstom (). They areused as local buses but use track bars of the railway system.

"Trains" if they are on a dedicated track.
"Trams" if they run on rails laid in the road.
"Streetcar" if they run on rails laid in the road and you live in America.

They may individually have manufacturers type/logo/model names, such as "ADTranz". Something like the difference between "aeroplane" and "Jumbo Jet"
I mean the vehicles like Regio-Shuttle (http://www.dot.state.co.us/NFRTAFS/korve/karl d~1/sld025.htm) or Alstom (). They are used as local buses but use track bars of the railway system.

I don't think we have a lot of those in the U.S. If the rails or tracks (not "track bars", by the way) are in the streets, they'd be streetcars or trolleys. If not, maybe commuter trains or rapid-transit trains. The latter terms apply to the kind of service, not the kind of vehicle.

Jerry Friedman
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I mean the vehicles like Regio-Shuttle (http://www.dot.state.co.us/NFRTAFS/korve/karl d~1/sld025.htm) or Alstom (). They are used as local buses but use track bars of the railway system.

They look like trains to me. (If they ran on rails in the streets, they'd be trams (short for "tramcars"), but these ones clearly don't do that.) You might call them "railcars", which I think is the usual British railwaymen's word for single units running on the railway; but the general public just call them "trains". One common kind, in which there's more than one car, is technically called "a diesel multiple unit", or "DMU"; I think there must also be "electric multiple units" too; but, again, most people just call them "trains".

The idea underlying the word "train", that it consists of a group of vehicles being pulled, is now not very significant in the public mind. Instead, it generally means merely any transport on rails which is not a tram. In Australia, though, there are "road trains" consisting of a truck pulling more than one trailer: nasty things!

Mike.
I mean the vehicles like Regio-Shuttle (http://www.dot.state.co.us/NFRTAFS/korve/karl d~1/sld025.htm

That page doesn't load, for me.
) or Alstom (). They are used as local buses but use track bars of the railway system.

The category that I think you want is "light-rail vehicle," which is more of the official name than the general public's term. There are undoubtedly differences among vehicles of this class where's our resident trainspotter today? Mark will tell you all you want to know, and more.
In Boston's public transit system, there are lines like the B branch of the Green Line that are partly like streetcars (rails can be sunk into the paving, and have some intersections with automobiles) and there are others, like the D branch, that have their own competely separate railway when above ground. Both share the same rails when in the downtown tunnels. But both are smaller than some of the other subway lines, and they're all smaller than the big trains like Amtrak.

Best Donna Richoux
I mean the vehicles like Regio-Shuttle (http://www.dot.state.co.us/NFRTAFS/korve/karl d~1/sld025.htm) or Alstom (). They areused as local buses but use track bars of the railway system.

Mancunians call them trams.
http://www.gmpte.com/content.cfm?category id=102783

Adrian
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I mean the vehicles like Regio-Shuttle (http://www.dot.state.co.us/NFRTAFS/korve/karl d~1/sld025.htm) or Alstom (). They areused as local buses but use track bars of the railway system.

They look like trains to me. (If they ran on rails in the streets, they'd be trams (short for "tramcars"), ... a tram. In Australia, though, there are "road trains" consisting of a truck pulling more than one trailer: nasty things!

Saw some photos of those Aussie trains. In some US regions a 3-bottom rig is allowed, while in Wisconsin the double-bottom is allowed, but only on some highways and industrial city routes. The photos of the Aussie road trains, I believe were made during some kind of driver exhibition or competition up to 28 trailers behind one tractor. I don't think we ever asked the poster what the limit is in Australia.
I mean the vehicles like Regio-Shuttle (http://www.dot.state.co.us/NFRTAFS/korve/karl d~1/sld025.htm) or Alstom (). They are used as local buses but use track bars of the railway system.

If they are what I think they are, small two or three car trains running on standard tracks with overhead electric source, then the term commonly used is "light rail". In St. Louis, the particular implementation is the MetroLink.
Brian Rodenborn
I mean the vehicles like Regio-Shuttle

I don't think we have a lot of those in the U.S. If the rails or tracks (not "track bars", by the way) are in the streets, they'd be streetcars or trolleys. If not, maybe commuter trains or rapid-transit trains.

"Light rail" is a term that is common in Pittsburgh for what used to be streetcar lines. I have heard the term in a few other places, as well.
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