There is a four-letter English word that can be a noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction or interjection. What is it? Are there any others?
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There is a four-letter English word that can be a noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction or interjection. What is it?

After the Great Gry Scandal, I'm suspicious. Do you know first-hand that there is a good answer and you are posing this to us as a solvable riddle, or are you just passing this along because you don't know any answer?
There are very few four-letter prepositions, and also very few four-letter conjunctions. I get four possible categories for "till" and five for "down".

Once burned, twice gry Donna Richoux
There is a four-letter English word that can be a noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction or interjection. What is it?

After the Great Gry Scandal, I'm suspicious. Do you know first-hand that there is a good answer and you are ... few four-letter prepositions, and also very few four-letter conjunctions. I get four possible categories for "till" and five for "down".

The conjecture that the word might be indelicate led me to this website
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A753527
which contains some fascinating, but probably erroneous, etymologies and information about the old lady's abode that I was previously unaware of.
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After the Great Gry Scandal, I'm suspicious. Do you know ... get four possible categories for "till" and five for "down".

The conjecture that the word might be indelicate led me to this website http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A753527 which contains some fascinating, but probably erroneous, etymologies and information about the old lady's abode that I was previously unaware of.

Odd use of asterisks in that page, I thought.
I don't get the bit about the name being a euphemism. There's more authoritative info at
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=1167

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
The conjecture that the word might be indelicate led me ... the old lady's abode that I was previously unaware of.

Odd use of asterisks in that page, I thought.

Me too. If Wilmur Flintstone can say 'bollocks', why not write it out?
I don't get the bit about the name being a euphemism. There's more authoritative info at http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=1167

More at
http://www.michaelbrooke.com/2004/03/groping-grubs-and-grapes.html

Several other sites seem to have picked up the Threadneedle Street rumour. How about the Oxford locations? Magpie Lane or Grape Street?
There is a four-letter English word that can be a noun,

I'm very fond of riddles, enigmas, puzzles and the like.
verb,

As I said, I like riddles.
adjective,

Have you any other like riddles for me?
adverb,

I love them like crazy. (The AHD4 says it's an adverb here.)
preposition,

It's just like the great summer doldrums competition, isn't it?
conjunction

As if I would speak like there were no prescriptivists in this group!
or interjection.

The OED says it's "colloq. (orig. U.S.), as a meaningless interjection or expletive", so, like, I feel I'm entitled to use it that way, like.

I 'd like my sheep now, please.

Isabelle Cecchini
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Re: what English word can be any part of speech?

Any.

Personal accounts are good because they lessen the liability against future taxes of the retiree while sequestering the funds he's been paying in so they cannot be used to mask current general fund deficits.
Like, wow!

john
I've never heard of Grape St. Here is something authoritative on Magpie Lane, from one of my favourite sites.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
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