+0
Windsor Casting in Ontario also will be idled, as was previously announced following contract negotiations with the Canadian Auto Workers.
It must be remembered that, as was shown early on in this article, in the beginning of the last cycle there were only a few countries around.

As was the case with Davie’s research, hostile commentary ensued from disease model extremists.


It appears that 'as' fuctions as a conjunction as well as a subject in the clause it is part of. Do you have a grammatical name for it?

Comments  
as is a conjunction in your examples, and means in the same way.
Inchoateknowledgeas is a conjunction in your examples, and means in the same way.
I do agree with you on it being a conjuction, but the other part of my question was the missing subject in the clauses in question. Does "as' also function as the subject? That is the crux of my question.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hello


As was the case with Davie’s research, hostile commentary ensued from disease model extremists.

No, it is not the subject. IMO, it is an adverb (as = in the same way = how?)
When I asaked the original question, I was a bit confused having been asked the same question by someone else.

Having thouht it over, things became clear to me. The subject of the subordiaationg clause is often omitted as the be verb.

When (you are) in town, give me a call.

We are very familar with this type of construction, where the subject and its 'be' verb is omitted.

In the sentence quoted in the original question, I was a bit confused because the subject of the subordinating was missing while its be verb was clearly present.

I've just realized that either the subject and 'be' verb or the subject alone can be omitted in the subordinating clauses whoes conjuctions is 'as'. By the way, 'as' in this context is a conjuction, not an adverb as suggested in one of the above replies.

There was a slight haze, as was often seen in the dry season, so that the full heat of the sun was not yet upon us.
There was a slight haze, as often seen in the dry season, so that the full heat of the sun was not yet upon us.
That's a relative pronoun. It's called a pesudo relative clause.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Fantasy By the way, 'as' in this context is a conjuction, not an adverb as suggested in one of the above replies.
When (you are) in town, give me a call.

When does a double duty as an adverb and a conjunction.
As regards your sentence below: same thing.

"There was a slight haze, as (it) was often seen in the dry season, so that the full heat of the sun was not yet upon us.